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Legal Negligence Claims

Legal negligence can lead to significant financial loss or damage

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I am very happy and satisfied with the settlement you achieved for me and the service was excellent and thank you very much

Mrs E.Swaffield
Loughborough

Making a claim for legal negligence

Like other professionals, solicitors, barristers and other legal professionals are not immune from getting things wrong.  But when they do, it can result in significant financial loss or damage. Legal negligence can range from incorrect or misleading advice, failure to properly prepare and draft paperwork in accordance with their client’s instructions, and under-settling or losing a claim.

BARRISTER CLAIMS SOLICITOR CLAIMS

Our expert team will call you...

Our Financial, Property and Professional Claims team is headed by senior solicitor Claire Critchley who has over 10 years’ experience dealing with complex legal claims against a variety of professionals.

This includes claims against surveyors, architects, estate agents and solicitors, in addition to dealing with financial disputes involving mis-sold mortgages and interest rate swaps.

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This is not about a claims culture. We just want to defend the rights of the people who are suffering because of this.

Claire Critchley

Head of Professional Negligence

What our customers say

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“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

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“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

Mr Dowse
Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Understanding what went wrong
Step
2
Reviewing relevant documents
Step
3
Obtaining an initial response to your grievance
Step
4
Sending the Letter of Claim
Step
5
The professional’s detailed response
Step
86
Issuing court proceedingsTaking a detailed statement
Step
7
Obtaining experts’ reports
Step
68
Taking a detailed statementIssuing court proceedings
Step
9
Attending your court trial
Step
10
Awarding your compensation claim

Your questions... answered

What types of legal negligence are there?

There are many ways legal negligence can occur.  Here are just a few examples which could affect you:

Property-related matters

  • Missing important rights of way
  • Failing to identify a defect in the property title
  • Incorrectly advising upon or drafting a lease
  • Failing to advise about Planning Permission and Building Regulations

Wills and Probate

  • Failing to administer the deceased’s estate correctly
  • Improper or inadequate advice
  • Failing to draft a will in accordance with your instructions

Personal injury claims

  • Under-settling personal injury claims
  • Improper or inadequate advice
  • Missed deadlines
  • Issues surrounding Limitation
  • Failure to properly investigate or prepare your case
  • Failure to fully consider the extent of your injuries
  • Suing the wrong party
  • Solicitor’s conduct causing the claim to be struck out by the Court
Read less

Examples of legal professional negligence

When you instruct a solicitor or barrister to represent you, you expect them to use their professional experience and professional expertise to help you win your legal case.

Unfortunately, there are situations where the negligent actions of a solicitor or barrister can affect the outcome of the case or court action, causing you either a financial loss or other type of damage. If this has happened to you, you could have grounds to make a claim for professional negligence.

Here are just some examples of professional negligence in the legal industry:

Missed limitations

If your solicitor or barrister has missed a limitation date or time limit set by the court to file certain documents or make a claim, your case may be thrown out, or you may be prevented from pursuing a claim altogether.

Use of the wrong expert

In court, many legal professionals call upon other experts to provide context and supporting evidence for a case. If your solicitor or barrister called the wrong expert, this may have meant that your case was not accurately and completely presented to the court.

Missed a part of your claim

Many claims nowadays come with multiple parts – for example, a personal injury case would involve not only a claim for damages but also for loss or earnings as well as future healthcare and assistance. If your solicitor missed one of these parts, you may not be able to claim for it within your personal injury claim.

Issued the claim against the wrong defendant

If a solicitor or barrister doesn’t identify the correct defendant to issue a claim against, you could make a claim of your own. For example, if you were injured at work and your solicitor mistakenly claimed against your employer when they should have claimed against an equipment manufacturer.

Failed to investigate essential evidence

It’s your legal representative’s duty to thoroughly investigate all evidence that may support your claim in court. If they do not, they could miss a vital piece of evidence that has a detrimental impact on your claim.

Provided incorrect advice on funding or insuring your case

If your solicitor provides incorrect advice on After The Event insurance or other relevant funding to your case, they may be found to have been professionally negligent.

Didn’t properly represent you at court

You may feel that your legal representative did not represent you well enough in court – perhaps they did not prepare the right papers for court or sent someone to court who did not know your case well enough to represent you properly.

Under-settled your claim

If your solicitor settled a claim which was subsequently found to be worth much more, you could make a claim against them for the difference.

These are just some of the main ways in which a legal representative could be professionally negligent.  If you feel your legal case was mishandled in any way, our expert professional negligence solicitors are happy to discuss your case free of charge so you can decide whether to proceed with a claim.

Read less

There are many ways legal negligence can occur.  Here are just a few examples which could affect you:

Property-related matters

  • Missing important rights of way
  • Failing to identify a defect in the property title
  • Incorrectly advising upon or drafting a lease
  • Failing to advise about Planning Permission and Building Regulations

Wills and Probate

  • Failing to administer the deceased’s estate correctly
  • Improper or inadequate advice
  • Failing to draft a will in accordance with your instructions

Personal injury claims

  • Under-settling personal injury claims
  • Improper or inadequate advice
  • Missed deadlines
  • Issues surrounding Limitation
  • Failure to properly investigate or prepare your case
  • Failure to fully consider the extent of your injuries
  • Suing the wrong party
  • Solicitor’s conduct causing the claim to be struck out by the Court
Read less

When you instruct a solicitor or barrister to represent you, you expect them to use their professional experience and professional expertise to help you win your legal case.

Unfortunately, there are situations where the negligent actions of a solicitor or barrister can affect the outcome of the case or court action, causing you either a financial loss or other type of damage. If this has happened to you, you could have grounds to make a claim for professional negligence.

Here are just some examples of professional negligence in the legal industry:

Missed limitations

If your solicitor or barrister has missed a limitation date or time limit set by the court to file certain documents or make a claim, your case may be thrown out, or you may be prevented from pursuing a claim altogether.

Use of the wrong expert

In court, many legal professionals call upon other experts to provide context and supporting evidence for a case. If your solicitor or barrister called the wrong expert, this may have meant that your case was not accurately and completely presented to the court.

Missed a part of your claim

Many claims nowadays come with multiple parts – for example, a personal injury case would involve not only a claim for damages but also for loss or earnings as well as future healthcare and assistance. If your solicitor missed one of these parts, you may not be able to claim for it within your personal injury claim.

Issued the claim against the wrong defendant

If a solicitor or barrister doesn’t identify the correct defendant to issue a claim against, you could make a claim of your own. For example, if you were injured at work and your solicitor mistakenly claimed against your employer when they should have claimed against an equipment manufacturer.

Failed to investigate essential evidence

It’s your legal representative’s duty to thoroughly investigate all evidence that may support your claim in court. If they do not, they could miss a vital piece of evidence that has a detrimental impact on your claim.

Provided incorrect advice on funding or insuring your case

If your solicitor provides incorrect advice on After The Event insurance or other relevant funding to your case, they may be found to have been professionally negligent.

Didn’t properly represent you at court

You may feel that your legal representative did not represent you well enough in court – perhaps they did not prepare the right papers for court or sent someone to court who did not know your case well enough to represent you properly.

Under-settled your claim

If your solicitor settled a claim which was subsequently found to be worth much more, you could make a claim against them for the difference.

These are just some of the main ways in which a legal representative could be professionally negligent.  If you feel your legal case was mishandled in any way, our expert professional negligence solicitors are happy to discuss your case free of charge so you can decide whether to proceed with a claim.

Read less