8.5 | 117 Reviews
Call us
0151 550 5228
Track Your Claim

Forceps and Ventouse Assisted Delivery Claims

Assisted delivery negligence & forceps and ventouse injury claims

Brilliant service

Trust Pilot - Your Legal Friend 8.5 | 117 Reviews

 

Claiming for assisted delivery injuries

The majority of expectant mothers deliver their baby safely and naturally, but at times this isn’t possible and an assisted birth may be necessary for the health of either the mother or baby. Undergoing a forceps or ventouse delivery can be a traumatic experience. However, if the obstetrician does not use the appropriate standard of care you and your baby are at risk of suffering significant injury. Thankfully the standard of care in Maternity hospitals in the UK is generally very good. But if you do suffer as a result of medical negligence during an assisted delivery, the consequences can be significant for both mother and baby.

Many victims of medical negligence, including those affected by a mismanaged forceps birth can be left feeling like there isn’t much they can do about their experiences even if they are left with physical and emotional problems. However, the Hospital and its clinicians can be held to account. If you’ve experienced medical negligence during an assisted delivery; if there were delays, complications or an injury to you or your baby, you have the right to an explanation as to what went wrong.

Every case is different but Your Legal Friend can guide you through each stage of the process, from investigating medical negligence to making a claim. Our expert team understands that making a claim cannot undo the negligence you experienced during a forceps delivery but it can help you recover, pay for medical costs, move forward and allow you to understand why the negligence occurred was able to happen.

Our team of specialist medical negligence solicitors work on behalf of victims of medical negligence in a wide variety of negligence cases, including representing those that have been affected by forceps and vacuum-assisted birth complications. We have the know-how to ensure the best possible outcome for each individual case. We also work on behalf of families who have lost a loved one as a result of medical negligence. We recognise that the consequences of the negligence may be physical, emotional and financial. Throughout your case, we will do our best to provide you with the help and support you need.

Read less

Watch some helpful related videos

Our expert team will call you...

Our medical negligence team has years of experience working on a wide variety of medical malpractice cases so we understand just how difficult a decision it can be to bring a medical negligence case.

Medical Negligence Team.jpg

That’s why we are committed to guiding you through every step of the process. We ensure that your claim is handled carefully and professionally by our specialist solicitors, while working alongside medical experts, to guarantee the best results for you.

Our medical negligence team is headed by Laura Morgan who has a wealth of experience in leading complicated, high-value medical negligence cases.

Laura is recognised within the legal profession as a leader in the field of medical negligence and serious injury compensation.  Laura has acted in a wide range of cases over her 17 years of practice and has particular expertise in acting for children who have suffered brain injury due to mismanaged birth or surgical errors, and in managing claims that have resulted in the death of a loved one. Laura has achieved a number of large settlements including £5.4 million for a 7 year old and £4 million for an 11 year old child.

Laura’s expertise and dedication to her clients is recognised in the Chambers guide to the Legal Profession in which she was praised for the efficiency of her approach to case handling and described as “tenacious and detail-oriented”.

Laura has been a member of the Law Society Clinical Negligence Panel since 2005 and accredited as a Senior Litigator in the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL) since 2006.  Laura is also a member of the specialist lawyers panel for Action against Medical Accidents (AvMA), the UK’s leading charity committed to patient safety and justice.

Talk to us today

For an informal, confidential chat with one of our specialist medical negligence solicitors, call us now on 0808 115 9269(calls free from landlines and mobiles). Or just complete the 'Start a new claim’ option on the right and we'll call you straight back.

Read less

Request a callback that suits you

When would you like us to call?

The effects of medical negligence can be devastating for the individual and their families, so securing appropriate compensation for them as quickly as possible is our top priority.

Laura Morgan

Director of Medical Negligence

What our customers say

Mrs. Vora's portrait

“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

A photo of Mr Dowse

“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

Mr Dowse
Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Obtaining your medical records
Step
2
Providing your statement of what happened
Step
3
Minimising your loss
Step
4
Establishing that a breach of duty occurred
Step
5
Estabilishing the effect of the breach of duty
Step
86
Preparing your case for CourtCalculating the value of your claim
Step
7
Proving your loss
Step
68
Calculating the value of your claimPreparing your case for Court
Step
9
Attending the trial in Court
Step
10
Awarding your compensation claim

Your questions... answered

When is a forceps delivery necessary?

An assisted birth, including forceps delivery, may be needed if there is a danger to the mother or baby. There are a number of reasons it may be necessary, including:

  • Concerns about the baby’s heart rate
  • The baby being in an awkward position
  • The mother being too exhausted

If medical professionals decide an assisted delivery is necessary there are two choices; a vacuum-assisted delivery, also referred to as ventouse assisted delivery, or forceps assisted delivery. In the majority of cases, both ventouse and forceps are safe and effective and an obstetrician will choose the type of instrument more suitable for each individual case. If a forceps or vacuum extraction is necessary, the procedure and risks should be explained to the mother by an obstetrician or midwife and consent should be obtained.

Read less

How common are forceps deliveries?

Around one in eight women in the UK has had an assisted birth to help deliver the baby’s head, according to the NHS. The majority of the time, assisted births are necessary for the health and wellbeing of mother and baby and are perfectly safe for both.

What is a forceps delivery?

Forceps used in delivery are smooth metal instruments that are curved and designed to fit around a baby’s head. The instrument is carefully positioned around the baby’s head, and during a contraction, an obstetrician gently pulls to help deliver the baby. Forceps assisted birth could be necessary for many reasons and there are different types of forceps. Some, for instance, are specifically designed to turn a baby to the right position to be born.

A forceps-assisted delivery is generally more successful than a ventouse in delivering a baby but there are still risks and the potential for complications or a traumatic forceps delivery that can pose harm to both the mother and baby.

Read less

Are forceps deliveries safe?

The majority of the time assisted deliveries are safe for both the mother and baby and are only used when necessary. However, both forceps-assisted delivery and vacuum-assisted deliveries require a high level of skill and expertise and there are associated risks. These risks should always be explained to you beforehand by one of your medical team and verbal consent must be given or, if you are required to go into theatre, written consent should be obtained.

Does a forceps delivery hurt?

If a forceps delivery or ventouse birth is necessary and you haven’t already had an epidural, you will usually be given local anaesthetic to numb the area. In many instances, this means the mother can’t feel the contractions and the midwife will tell her when to push.

After the birth, it’s normal to feel pain, soreness or numbness as a result of an assisted birth and many women will need to take plenty of time to recover. Each situation is different and some new mothers may be required to stay in the hospital for a couple of days after the birth and the community midwife may keep you on her list for up to 28 days after your baby’s birth if it’s taking you a while to recover physically.

Read less

How does a forceps or ventouse delivery affect the baby?

The effects of ventouse or forceps delivery risks to the baby are generally minor and heal on their own in a short period of time. The effects of an assisted birth on the baby include:

  • Chignon

One of the vacuum delivery side effects is a mark on the baby’s head known as a chignon. This is caused by the suction of the vacuum but it is typically only superficial and will disappear within 48 hours. 

  • Cephalohematoma

Another forceps and ventouse delivery side effect is cephalohematoma, a bruise on the baby’s head. This can occur in between 1 and 12 births out of 100 and disappears over time. While it can slightly increase the chances of jaundice it rarely leads to other problems. 

  • Forceps marks and small cuts

The use of forceps can lead to marks on the baby’s face and head, these usually disappear within 48 hours. In around 1 in 10 assisted deliveries there will be small cuts to the baby’s face and scalp, again, these typically heal quickly and are superficial only.

As well as these minor effects of an assisted birth on the baby there are also more significant risks that are outlined below.

Read less

What are the risks of a forceps delivery to the baby?

In the majority of cases, babies delivered through an assisted delivery are only affected in minor ways that will heal on their own. However, there are significant risks that should be considered in each individual set of circumstances.

  • Can forceps delivery cause brain damage?

A common concern among expectant mothers are the risks around forceps delivery and brain damage. The proper use of both forceps and vacuum extraction is essential to ensure the instrument is applied evenly to a baby’s head and without excessive force. Too much strain can lead to compression of the head, swelling in the brain and haemorrhages that can result in brain damage and resultant conditions, although this is very rare.

  • Can forceps delivery cause nerve damage?

The wrong assisted delivery method or the technique being performed poorly can result in nerve damage occurring in a limited number of cases. Nerves injured in forceps delivery can result in facial palsy, the paralysis of the muscle in one side of the face.

  • Can forceps delivery cause eye damage or blindness?

There have been instances of babies being born blind or with permanent eye damage after a forceps delivery was not performed correctly. It is rare but medical negligence during a delivery can occur and have a lifelong impact.

  • Can forceps delivery cause deafness?

Trauma during the birth can cause damage to the ears and in some cases deafness. While this is rare, the injuries can be permanent, including those sustained due to a forceps delivery.

  • Can forceps delivery cause cerebral palsy?

A traumatic forceps delivery could result in cerebral palsy in a limited number of cases. Cerebral palsy is the term given to a number of neurological conditions that affect movement and coordination, the severity of which varies. A traumatic delivery can cause cerebral palsy if excessive force or strain is applied to the baby’s head, causing brain damage.

  • Can forceps delivery cause epilepsy?

Yes, in rare cases. Epilepsy and other seizure disorders can be caused by a traumatic assisted delivery if a skull fracture occurs or excessive force is applied during the delivery. Epilepsy is a common side effect of cerebral palsy, particularly in severe cases.

  • Can forceps delivery cause autism and ADHD?

Studies have linked birth injuries to ADHD and autism. There are a number of injuries that have been indicated to be linked to disorders, included among these are injuries caused by forceps and vacuum extraction births, such as damage to the nervous system and swelling of the brain.

Read less

Can forceps delivery cause damage to the mother?

Both forceps and ventouse delivery complications can affect the woman giving birth. Before an assisted birth these risks should be highlighted and consent given. The risks include: 

  • Vaginal tearing or episiotomy

Some women may need to undergo an episiotomy prior to a forceps delivery. This is where a surgical cut is made between the anus and vagina to provide more room to help with the delivery of the baby. In some instances, mismanagement of the birth can lead to vaginal tearing that may require stitching, but often an episiotomy is performed before tearing is allowed to occur. These should be repaired, or sutured, with dissolvable stitches to support the healing process.

  • Third or fourth-degree vaginal tear

According to the NHS, third or four-degree vaginal tears are an injury that between 8 and 12 women in 100 experience when undergoing a forceps delivery. The risk is lower when a vacuum extraction device is used, with 4 in 100 women experiencing tears. The figures compare to just 1 in 100 women experience a third or fourth-degree vaginal tear during a normal vaginal birth. 

  • Risk of blood clots

Ventouse and forceps delivery side effects can include increasing the risk of blood clots forming in the veins in the legs and pelvis. Medical professionals should advise you to move around as much as possible after the birth to lower the risk of this. Women may also be advised to wear specialist anti-clot stockings and have injections of heparin too.

  • Incontinence

Incontinence is a common side effect after childbirth. However, it is more common among those that have had an assisted delivery. Research suggests that around 30% of women experience urinary incontinence after birth and they should be offered physiotherapy-directed ways to help with this. If third or fourth-degree tears have been a complication of vacuum delivery or forceps usage, there is also a greater risk of anal incontinence.

Read less

What does ventouse delivery mean?

A ventouse or a vacuum extractor is an instrument that is attached to the baby’s head by suction. Vacuum extraction involves a soft or hard plastic or metal cup being fitted firmly to the baby’s head, before an obstetrician or midwife gently pulls to help deliver the baby.

The device used to perform a vacuum extraction is also known as a ‘kiwi’ and the method is sometimes also called kiwi cup delivery. Birth by vacuum extraction is not suitable if the baby is being delivered at less than 34 weeks as the baby’s head is too soft. The suction cup results in a chignon, where the suction cup used leaves a small swelling on the baby’s head. However, this does disappear quickly, as should any bruising that it causes. A ventouse delivery is typically not as successful as a forceps delivery but it is less likely to cause vaginal tearing.

Read less

Is vacuum delivery safe?

In most cases vacuum delivery is safe and an essential decision to ensure that both mother and baby are healthy. Assisted delivery, both through vacuum and forceps delivery do carry risks and require a skilled obstetrician to carry out the procedure to ensure risks are minimised. These risks should always be explained to you beforehand and consent should be given. 

Is vacuum delivery painful?

As with a forceps delivery, you are usually given local anaesthetic before a vacuum delivery. As a result, the actual delivery should not be painful. However, after the birth, it’s likely you’ll need some time to recover physically and it’s common to experience pain, soreness and numbness in the intervening days. Your condition should be carefully monitored by a midwife who will ensure you heal fully and will be able to offer advice.

What are the risks of a vacuum delivery to the baby?

In most cases, babies delivered by vacuum delivery are only affected in minor ways, such as bruises and light cuts that quickly heal. But there are risks that should be considered and can cause long-term damage to the baby affected.

  • Can ventouse delivery cause autism?

Research has shown that autism can be linked to birth injuries, including those sustained through a ventouse delivery. In rare cases, a vacuum delivery can damage the nervous system and the baby’s head, which may lead to autism and other associated disorders, such as ADHD.

  • Can ventouse delivery cause brain damage?

The improper use of a vacuum extractor can result in brain damage. Failure to use an assisted delivery instrument properly can mean that too much force is applied to the baby’s head or that the pressure is unevenly distributed. There are rare cases where this has led to skull fractures and brain damage.

  • Can vacuum delivery cause cerebral palsy?

A traumatic delivery where excessive force or strain is applied when assisting a birth with a vacuum extractor can cause cerebral palsy. The severity of the condition varies and depends on a number of factors but in the majority of cases it affects movement. A common side effect of cerebral palsy is seizures or epilepsy.

Read less

Do I have an assisted delivery medical negligence claim?

In order to make a successful claim for medical negligence compensation, you must be able to demonstrate that the level of care that either the mother, baby or both received was sub-standard. You should be able to rely on your midwife, obstetricians and other medical professionals to deliver an excellent standard of treatment. If this hasn’t been the case, you may be able to pursue a birth injury claim for compensation.

During assisted deliveries, there are several ways medical negligence can occur, including:

  • Wrong choice of assisted delivery

There are several factors to consider when choosing between a forceps delivery or a vacuum assisted birth and the wrong choice could have an impact on the health of both mother and baby, such as scaring to the baby’s face or vaginal tears. Medical professionals should take each personal situation into consideration in order to minimise the risks while ensuring the safe delivery of the baby.

  • Preventable damage

The majority of the time, forceps and vacuum births are safe. But if the instruments are used incorrectly it can lead to damage that could have been prevented, such as lacerations of the cervix or extensive scarring to the baby’s head.

  • Delays

If a baby is distressed or in an awkward position it can be vital that either a forceps delivery or vacuum extraction is performed quickly. Delays can cause further problems and while it’s important that the procedure is done correctly, the speed to make the decision and how quickly the solution is delivered can also be a contributing factor to forceps and ventouse birth side effects. 

  • Poor treatment

During the birth of the baby or while recovering afterwards you are right to expect proper treatment that meets your needs. However, sometimes bad treatment can lead to other issues, for instance, a poorly repaired episiotomy could result in an infection, or failure to advise may mean blood clots are more likely to develop.

Read less

Why should I make a medical negligence claim for an assisted birth?

We understand that making a medical negligence claim can’t undo the damage, pain and stress you have endured as a result of forceps or vacuum extraction delivery complications. However, if you feel that medical malpractice has caused you suffering and distress at a time in your life that should have been among your happiest, compensation can help you to adjust to your circumstances and potentially make your situation that little bit easier to manage.

If after experiencing forceps or vacuum-assisted birth complications you were required to take additional time off work in order to recover, compensation could help you cover the loss of income. If either the mother or baby that experienced a traumatic forceps delivery or vacuum-assisted birth requires additional medical attention or long-term medical treatment, compensation too can help ensure that you receive the best treatment possible.

As well as financial compensation, a medical negligence claim can help you to hold those responsible for the damage to account and help you understand why you were failed by the health care system.

Read less

An assisted birth, including forceps delivery, may be needed if there is a danger to the mother or baby. There are a number of reasons it may be necessary, including:

  • Concerns about the baby’s heart rate
  • The baby being in an awkward position
  • The mother being too exhausted

If medical professionals decide an assisted delivery is necessary there are two choices; a vacuum-assisted delivery, also referred to as ventouse assisted delivery, or forceps assisted delivery. In the majority of cases, both ventouse and forceps are safe and effective and an obstetrician will choose the type of instrument more suitable for each individual case. If a forceps or vacuum extraction is necessary, the procedure and risks should be explained to the mother by an obstetrician or midwife and consent should be obtained.

Read less

Around one in eight women in the UK has had an assisted birth to help deliver the baby’s head, according to the NHS. The majority of the time, assisted births are necessary for the health and wellbeing of mother and baby and are perfectly safe for both.

Forceps used in delivery are smooth metal instruments that are curved and designed to fit around a baby’s head. The instrument is carefully positioned around the baby’s head, and during a contraction, an obstetrician gently pulls to help deliver the baby. Forceps assisted birth could be necessary for many reasons and there are different types of forceps. Some, for instance, are specifically designed to turn a baby to the right position to be born.

A forceps-assisted delivery is generally more successful than a ventouse in delivering a baby but there are still risks and the potential for complications or a traumatic forceps delivery that can pose harm to both the mother and baby.

Read less

The majority of the time assisted deliveries are safe for both the mother and baby and are only used when necessary. However, both forceps-assisted delivery and vacuum-assisted deliveries require a high level of skill and expertise and there are associated risks. These risks should always be explained to you beforehand by one of your medical team and verbal consent must be given or, if you are required to go into theatre, written consent should be obtained.

If a forceps delivery or ventouse birth is necessary and you haven’t already had an epidural, you will usually be given local anaesthetic to numb the area. In many instances, this means the mother can’t feel the contractions and the midwife will tell her when to push.

After the birth, it’s normal to feel pain, soreness or numbness as a result of an assisted birth and many women will need to take plenty of time to recover. Each situation is different and some new mothers may be required to stay in the hospital for a couple of days after the birth and the community midwife may keep you on her list for up to 28 days after your baby’s birth if it’s taking you a while to recover physically.

Read less

The effects of ventouse or forceps delivery risks to the baby are generally minor and heal on their own in a short period of time. The effects of an assisted birth on the baby include:

  • Chignon

One of the vacuum delivery side effects is a mark on the baby’s head known as a chignon. This is caused by the suction of the vacuum but it is typically only superficial and will disappear within 48 hours. 

  • Cephalohematoma

Another forceps and ventouse delivery side effect is cephalohematoma, a bruise on the baby’s head. This can occur in between 1 and 12 births out of 100 and disappears over time. While it can slightly increase the chances of jaundice it rarely leads to other problems. 

  • Forceps marks and small cuts

The use of forceps can lead to marks on the baby’s face and head, these usually disappear within 48 hours. In around 1 in 10 assisted deliveries there will be small cuts to the baby’s face and scalp, again, these typically heal quickly and are superficial only.

As well as these minor effects of an assisted birth on the baby there are also more significant risks that are outlined below.

Read less

In the majority of cases, babies delivered through an assisted delivery are only affected in minor ways that will heal on their own. However, there are significant risks that should be considered in each individual set of circumstances.

  • Can forceps delivery cause brain damage?

A common concern among expectant mothers are the risks around forceps delivery and brain damage. The proper use of both forceps and vacuum extraction is essential to ensure the instrument is applied evenly to a baby’s head and without excessive force. Too much strain can lead to compression of the head, swelling in the brain and haemorrhages that can result in brain damage and resultant conditions, although this is very rare.

  • Can forceps delivery cause nerve damage?

The wrong assisted delivery method or the technique being performed poorly can result in nerve damage occurring in a limited number of cases. Nerves injured in forceps delivery can result in facial palsy, the paralysis of the muscle in one side of the face.

  • Can forceps delivery cause eye damage or blindness?

There have been instances of babies being born blind or with permanent eye damage after a forceps delivery was not performed correctly. It is rare but medical negligence during a delivery can occur and have a lifelong impact.

  • Can forceps delivery cause deafness?

Trauma during the birth can cause damage to the ears and in some cases deafness. While this is rare, the injuries can be permanent, including those sustained due to a forceps delivery.

  • Can forceps delivery cause cerebral palsy?

A traumatic forceps delivery could result in cerebral palsy in a limited number of cases. Cerebral palsy is the term given to a number of neurological conditions that affect movement and coordination, the severity of which varies. A traumatic delivery can cause cerebral palsy if excessive force or strain is applied to the baby’s head, causing brain damage.

  • Can forceps delivery cause epilepsy?

Yes, in rare cases. Epilepsy and other seizure disorders can be caused by a traumatic assisted delivery if a skull fracture occurs or excessive force is applied during the delivery. Epilepsy is a common side effect of cerebral palsy, particularly in severe cases.

  • Can forceps delivery cause autism and ADHD?

Studies have linked birth injuries to ADHD and autism. There are a number of injuries that have been indicated to be linked to disorders, included among these are injuries caused by forceps and vacuum extraction births, such as damage to the nervous system and swelling of the brain.

Read less

Both forceps and ventouse delivery complications can affect the woman giving birth. Before an assisted birth these risks should be highlighted and consent given. The risks include: 

  • Vaginal tearing or episiotomy

Some women may need to undergo an episiotomy prior to a forceps delivery. This is where a surgical cut is made between the anus and vagina to provide more room to help with the delivery of the baby. In some instances, mismanagement of the birth can lead to vaginal tearing that may require stitching, but often an episiotomy is performed before tearing is allowed to occur. These should be repaired, or sutured, with dissolvable stitches to support the healing process.

  • Third or fourth-degree vaginal tear

According to the NHS, third or four-degree vaginal tears are an injury that between 8 and 12 women in 100 experience when undergoing a forceps delivery. The risk is lower when a vacuum extraction device is used, with 4 in 100 women experiencing tears. The figures compare to just 1 in 100 women experience a third or fourth-degree vaginal tear during a normal vaginal birth. 

  • Risk of blood clots

Ventouse and forceps delivery side effects can include increasing the risk of blood clots forming in the veins in the legs and pelvis. Medical professionals should advise you to move around as much as possible after the birth to lower the risk of this. Women may also be advised to wear specialist anti-clot stockings and have injections of heparin too.

  • Incontinence

Incontinence is a common side effect after childbirth. However, it is more common among those that have had an assisted delivery. Research suggests that around 30% of women experience urinary incontinence after birth and they should be offered physiotherapy-directed ways to help with this. If third or fourth-degree tears have been a complication of vacuum delivery or forceps usage, there is also a greater risk of anal incontinence.

Read less

A ventouse or a vacuum extractor is an instrument that is attached to the baby’s head by suction. Vacuum extraction involves a soft or hard plastic or metal cup being fitted firmly to the baby’s head, before an obstetrician or midwife gently pulls to help deliver the baby.

The device used to perform a vacuum extraction is also known as a ‘kiwi’ and the method is sometimes also called kiwi cup delivery. Birth by vacuum extraction is not suitable if the baby is being delivered at less than 34 weeks as the baby’s head is too soft. The suction cup results in a chignon, where the suction cup used leaves a small swelling on the baby’s head. However, this does disappear quickly, as should any bruising that it causes. A ventouse delivery is typically not as successful as a forceps delivery but it is less likely to cause vaginal tearing.

Read less

In most cases vacuum delivery is safe and an essential decision to ensure that both mother and baby are healthy. Assisted delivery, both through vacuum and forceps delivery do carry risks and require a skilled obstetrician to carry out the procedure to ensure risks are minimised. These risks should always be explained to you beforehand and consent should be given. 

As with a forceps delivery, you are usually given local anaesthetic before a vacuum delivery. As a result, the actual delivery should not be painful. However, after the birth, it’s likely you’ll need some time to recover physically and it’s common to experience pain, soreness and numbness in the intervening days. Your condition should be carefully monitored by a midwife who will ensure you heal fully and will be able to offer advice.

In most cases, babies delivered by vacuum delivery are only affected in minor ways, such as bruises and light cuts that quickly heal. But there are risks that should be considered and can cause long-term damage to the baby affected.

  • Can ventouse delivery cause autism?

Research has shown that autism can be linked to birth injuries, including those sustained through a ventouse delivery. In rare cases, a vacuum delivery can damage the nervous system and the baby’s head, which may lead to autism and other associated disorders, such as ADHD.

  • Can ventouse delivery cause brain damage?

The improper use of a vacuum extractor can result in brain damage. Failure to use an assisted delivery instrument properly can mean that too much force is applied to the baby’s head or that the pressure is unevenly distributed. There are rare cases where this has led to skull fractures and brain damage.

  • Can vacuum delivery cause cerebral palsy?

A traumatic delivery where excessive force or strain is applied when assisting a birth with a vacuum extractor can cause cerebral palsy. The severity of the condition varies and depends on a number of factors but in the majority of cases it affects movement. A common side effect of cerebral palsy is seizures or epilepsy.

Read less

In order to make a successful claim for medical negligence compensation, you must be able to demonstrate that the level of care that either the mother, baby or both received was sub-standard. You should be able to rely on your midwife, obstetricians and other medical professionals to deliver an excellent standard of treatment. If this hasn’t been the case, you may be able to pursue a birth injury claim for compensation.

During assisted deliveries, there are several ways medical negligence can occur, including:

  • Wrong choice of assisted delivery

There are several factors to consider when choosing between a forceps delivery or a vacuum assisted birth and the wrong choice could have an impact on the health of both mother and baby, such as scaring to the baby’s face or vaginal tears. Medical professionals should take each personal situation into consideration in order to minimise the risks while ensuring the safe delivery of the baby.

  • Preventable damage

The majority of the time, forceps and vacuum births are safe. But if the instruments are used incorrectly it can lead to damage that could have been prevented, such as lacerations of the cervix or extensive scarring to the baby’s head.

  • Delays

If a baby is distressed or in an awkward position it can be vital that either a forceps delivery or vacuum extraction is performed quickly. Delays can cause further problems and while it’s important that the procedure is done correctly, the speed to make the decision and how quickly the solution is delivered can also be a contributing factor to forceps and ventouse birth side effects. 

  • Poor treatment

During the birth of the baby or while recovering afterwards you are right to expect proper treatment that meets your needs. However, sometimes bad treatment can lead to other issues, for instance, a poorly repaired episiotomy could result in an infection, or failure to advise may mean blood clots are more likely to develop.

Read less

We understand that making a medical negligence claim can’t undo the damage, pain and stress you have endured as a result of forceps or vacuum extraction delivery complications. However, if you feel that medical malpractice has caused you suffering and distress at a time in your life that should have been among your happiest, compensation can help you to adjust to your circumstances and potentially make your situation that little bit easier to manage.

If after experiencing forceps or vacuum-assisted birth complications you were required to take additional time off work in order to recover, compensation could help you cover the loss of income. If either the mother or baby that experienced a traumatic forceps delivery or vacuum-assisted birth requires additional medical attention or long-term medical treatment, compensation too can help ensure that you receive the best treatment possible.

As well as financial compensation, a medical negligence claim can help you to hold those responsible for the damage to account and help you understand why you were failed by the health care system.

Read less