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Amputation and Loss of Limb Claims

Negligent amputation claims and loss of limb compensation

A photo of Mrs Swaffield

I am very happy and satisfied with the settlement you achieved for me and the service was excellent and thank you very much

Mrs E.Swaffield
Loughborough

Claiming for amputation negligence

Extreme cases of medical negligence have led to patients having one or more limbs amputated. This is often due to a failure to diagnose or properly treat an existing medical condition such as cancer, diabetes or meningitis. It can also be an unfortunate consequence of negligence during a medical procedure, which resulted in serious injury or infection. It’s no surprise that such a severe turn of events can often have a catastrophic impact on the patient, their quality of life and their mental health.

If you have had to endure the trauma of limb amputation, particularly as a result of medical negligence, it’s vital that you receive all the help and support you need as you begin to adjust and rehabilitate.

That’s where Your Legal Friend comes in. We have years of experience working on medical negligence cases, many of which have involved amputation claims. From a legal point of view, we know how complicated these cases can be. More importantly, we understand that they can leave the victim feeling incredibly vulnerable, even embarrassed. With brain injuries, the psychological effects of medical negligence are often just as damaging as the physical impact. That’s why we are committed to guiding you through every step of the process. We will ensure that your claim is handled carefully and professionally by specialist solicitors, while working alongside medical experts, to guarantee the best results.

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Our medical negligence team has years of experience working on a wide variety of amputation cases so we understand just how difficult a decision it can be to bring an amputation case.

Amputation claims team

That’s why we are committed to guiding you through every step of the process. We ensure that your claim is handled carefully and professionally by our specialist solicitors, while working alongside medical experts, to guarantee the best results for you.

Our amputation negligence team is headed by Laura Morgan who has a wealth of experience in leading complicated, high-value amputation negligence cases.

If you would like us to advise you as to whether you can pursue an amputation claim, please call our freephone number or submit your details via the online form and we will contact you to schedule a free initial phone consultation at a time that suits you. If you decide that you want to proceed with a claim, one of our medical malpractice lawyers will be able to tell you whether you can enter into a No Win, No Fee agreement, meaning that in the event that your claim is unsuccessful, and you have co-operated fully with us throughout, you won’t have to pay any legal costs so there’s no financial risk to you.

Our specialist knowledge of both legal and medical issues, together with a sensitive awareness of how everyone involved is affected, means we can help you:

  • Find out the reason why something went wrong with a diagnosis, treatment or procedure.
  • Obtain financial compensation for the injury or harm caused and ensure the financial needs of providing the necessary care, treatment and support are properly met.
Read less

Request a callback that suits you

When would you like us to call?

The effects of medical negligence can be devastating for the individual and their families, so securing appropriate compensation for them as quickly as possible is our top priority.

Laura Morgan

Director of Medical Negligence

What our customers say

Mrs. Vora's portrait

“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

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“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

Mr Dowse
Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Obtaining your medical records
Step
2
Providing your statement of what happened
Step
3
Minimising your loss
Step
4
Establishing that a breach of duty occurred
Step
5
Estabilishing the effect of the breach of duty
Step
86
Preparing your case for CourtCalculating the value of your claim
Step
7
Proving your loss
Step
68
Calculating the value of your claimPreparing your case for Court
Step
9
Attending the trial in Court
Step
10
Awarding your compensation claim

Your questions... answered

What infections can lead to amputation?

Limb infections caused by open wound injuries or post-surgery complications can be life-threatening. The failure to promptly diagnose or treat correctly often requires further surgery and can lead to limb amputation.

Lymphoedema - a chronic (long-term) condition caused by a problem with the lymphatic system, which fights infection and drains excess fluid from tissues. The condition can deteriorate unless promptly treated.

Symptoms:

  • Swelling in the body's tissues, usually in the arms or legs.
  • Heaviness, dull pain and difficulty in limb movement.

Gangrene – the death of body tissue, usually in the toes, feet, fingers and hands, caused by loss of blood supply.

Symptoms:

  • Redness, swelling
  • Sores or blisters
  • Loss of sensation or severe pain in the affected area.

Diabetic foot ulcer – an area of broken down skin, usually on the lower leg or feet, which has failed to heal. Caused by high blood sugar levels and nerve damage. Diabetics with reduced nerve functioning are less able to feel sensation from an injury, such as a cut or blister to their feet. Even a mild injury can develop into a foot ulcer.

Symptoms:

  • Blood or pus drainage from the affected area
  • Noticeable lump 
  • Cracked, dry skin
  • Calluses, corns

Peripheral arterial disease – damage or narrowing of the arteries leading to poor circulation of the blood. The body's cells cannot receive the oxygen and nutrients they need from the bloodstream without an adequate blood flow. The affected tissue of the limb dies and infection can set in.

Symptoms

  • Painful cramping in the hip, thigh or calf muscles after activity
  • Leg numbness or weakness
  • Coldness in the lower leg or foot, compared to the other limb
  • Hair loss on legs/feet
  • Brittle, slow-growing toenails
  • Ulcers (open sores) on the feet and legs, which fail to heal
  • Changing skin colour, such as turning pale or blue
  • Shiny skin
  • Muscle deterioration
Read less

What are some common causes of amputation?

In many cases, the loss of a limb occurs because of:

  • Lack of blood supply to the affected limb
  • Failure or delay in properly monitoring any body tissue damage
  • Failure or delay in recognising severe infection.
  • Complex bone fractures and soft tissue injuries often cause permanent disability and require urgent specialist surgery.
  • A delay in receiving treatment can lead to later complications.

If you have suffered a serious injury to an arm or leg as a result of an accident, you expect the hospital to provide you with proper treatment to give you the best chance of recovery.  If you do not receive this and your condition gets worse, and you lose a limb or the function in a limb, you may have a claim for negligence against the hospital. Losing a limb can also have a life-changing, psychological effect upon both you and your family.

Read less

What are the stats on limb amputation?

  • Up to 20% of hospital infections each year are the result of a procedure (surgical site infections).
  • 5% of patients undergoing a surgical procedure develop a surgical site infection
  • Nearly half of all amputations are caused by nerve and circulatory problems that could have been prevented.
  • Two-thirds of all delays in lower limb amputations would have been avoided if surgery had been performed on a planned operating list.
  • Fewer than half of patients who needed leg amputation received good care because of a lack of communication between different disciplines and poor teamwork.
  • Around 6,000 new patient referrals to the NHS are for the fitting of a prosthetic limb following an amputation.
  • Around half of amputations are carried out on those aged 65 or over.
  • Twice as many males are amputees than women.                                                        
  • More than half of lower limb amputees had diabetes.
  • Nearly half of all amputations are caused by nerve and circulatory problems, which could have been prevented.
  • Nearly a quarter of patients who should have been given elective amputation, i.e. make the decision themselves, simply underwent emergency surgery.
Read less

Why would the decision be made to amputate a limb?

To prevent the spread of infection: Serious injury and damage to limb tissue can lead to the rapid spread of infection. Amputation of the affected limb is often the only measure to prevent the spread of further damage to other parts of the body.

A loss of blood supply, known as Ischaemia: Assessment should be made by a specialist within 12 hours of hospital admission and no more than 14 hours from arrival.

Other causes for amputation may include:

  • Severe injury from an accident in a vehicle, workplace machinery or serious burn
  • A cancerous tumour in the bone or muscle of the limb
  • A serious infection that fails to heal despite the use of antibiotics or other treatment
  • A growth or tumour of the nerve tissue called a neuroma

Do I have grounds for an amputation negligence claim?

Negligence in treating a serious limb injury, which required an amputation, may be caused by:

  • A delay resulting in surgical complications and/or
  • Infection leading to septicaemia (blood disease)
  • Loss of blood supply and the death of limb tissue.
  • The development of gangrene or mismanagement of diabetes.

For a claim of negligence to be successful, you have to show that:

  • The doctor, surgeon or hospital was in breach of the duty of care you are owed as their patient.
  • The care received fell below the standard that could “reasonably be expected” from an equally qualified specialist in the field.
  • The lack of care led directly to the injury or harm which was a “reasonably foreseeable consequence” of the actions or omissions of the doctor or other person providing the treatment.

When an operation goes wrong or an injury is not properly diagnosed or treated, no amount of compensation will be able to reverse the suffering and distress caused. Vital care, support and specialist equipment will be needed to ensure the best quality of life can be obtained for the victim of an amputated limb.

As experienced clinical negligence specialists, we know that you will want to find out why your surgeon or doctor failed you or a family member in their duty to provide the expected standard of diagnosis, treatment and care.

We ensure your case is properly investigated and your voice heard in order to bring the hospital, health trust or medical practitioner to account for the harm and suffering they have caused and to prevent others from suffering in a similar way.

Your Legal Friend is committed to ensuring victims of clinical negligence obtain answers and receive appropriate compensation so that their future medical treatment, support, equipment and care needs are properly met.

Read less

What is unnecessary limb amputation?

When performed as a life-saving measure, amputation of a limb is still a traumatic, life-changing experience for anyone to go through. But to discover that an amputation could have been avoided with a proper standard of medical treatment can have a severe psychological impact upon both the patient and their dependents.

If you or a member of your family has suffered an amputation that could have been prevented, you will be trying to come to terms with the shock of what happened. This means seeking an explanation for how such an error was allowed to have taken place.

How can diabetes lead to amputation?

Patients who suffer from diabetes are at particular risk of an amputated limb if their treatment isn’t properly managed. Irreversible complications can arise from a doctor or specialist who fails to reduce the risk of amputation or fails to provide the best possible course of treatment. 

  • Only one in eight patients with diabetes was admitted under the care of diabetes service.
  • Only six in ten patients with diabetes were reviewed by a diabetes nurse specialist prior to surgery.     

One of the most potentially serious of complications to affect patients with diabetes can be the damage caused to the nerves and blood vessels, which often leads to foot ulcers and a decision to amputate.

  • Foot ulcers affect one in ten diabetics.
  • Around 50 per cent of all amputations conducted in the UK are carried out on people who have diabetes.
Read less

What are diabetic vascular problems?

Diabetic vascular problems are also known as peripheral vascular disease – a condition that causes hardening and a subsequent blockage of the arteries.

A number of important diagnostic tests should have been carried out to check for vascular disease. A delay or failure by a doctor, clinician or a diabetics nurse to correctly diagnose, monitor or provide the appropriate standard of diabetic treatment and care can lead to major, life-changing harm and injury.

The partial or total blockage of an artery can prevent an adequate supply of blood to a part of the body - most often the foot – causing ulcers, infection and, in severe cases, tissue death, which requires amputation of the limb.

There can often be a devastating, psychological impact upon both the patient and family if an arm, leg, or even fingers or toes have been removed. This suffering and distress can be further increased if it’s discovered that the loss of a limb could have been prevented if the symptoms of diabetes-related vascular disease had not been missed or treatment delayed.

If you or a member of your family has suffered a preventable amputation, it could take a very long time to come to terms with what has happened, if at all.

Read less

What causes diabetic vascular disease?

The condition can arise from the onset of Type 2 diabetes and the body’s reduced ability to produce the insulin needed to transport glucose (blood sugar) from the bloodstream into the cells where it’s used to produce energy. As a result, an excess of blood sugar remains in the bloodstream for a longer period, increasing the likelihood that the blood vessel walls will ‘fur up’ and narrow – a condition known as ‘atherosclerosis’.

A lack of blood flow increases the risk of developing foot ulcers and gangrene which is tissue death caused by a lack of oxygen. If you have Type 2 diabetes you also have an increased risk of vascular disease if:

  • You are male
  • You have high blood pressure
  • You have high cholesterol levels
  • You smoke
  • You don't exercise
  • You’re overweight
  • You eat a high-fat diet
  • You suffer from stress
  • You have a family history of vascular disease, angina, heart attacks or stroke
Read less

What are the common symptoms of diabetes-related vascular problems?

  • Blurred vision
  • Seeing floating spots– ‘floaters’ – in front of the eyes
  • Swelling of the face or limbs or unexpected weight gain
  • Urine has a “foamy” appearance
  • Foot sores
  • Loss of feeling or a burning feeling in hands or feet
  • Pain in the legs when walking
  • High blood pressure
  • Chest pain

What other vascular diseases are linked to diabetes?

Neuropathy – a nerve condition resulting in a loss of protective sensation in the toes or feet. The inability to feel a cut or sore could lead to a worsening of the condition and the risk of infection. Damaged nerves supplying the foot muscles may not function properly causing the foot to not align properly. Excess pressure on one area of the foot can lead to foot ulcers.

Retinopathy - the abnormal growth of blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensitive membrane at the back of the eye.

Nephropathy - a kidney disease caused by damage to the small blood vessels, which reduces their ability to function efficiently or, in some cases, completely fail.

What tests should your doctor carry out for diabetic vascular problems?

General health - your GP or a doctor should ask questions concerning your general health, medical history, and symptoms.

Blood test – to measure glucose levels, cholesterol levels, urea – waste product in the urine, creatine - supplies energy to the muscle cells, and the rate at which blood is filtered through the kidneys.

Urine test – to detect micro amounts of a protein, which appear at the early stages of diabetic kidney disease.

Kidney biopsy (if necessary) - to confirm the diagnosis or determine the severity of the disease.

Eye test – to evaluate the blood vessels in your retinas and the presence of a retinopathy

ECG testing – to test the heart’s electrical activity by running/walking on a treadmill

ABI (ankle/brachial index) test - to measure blood pressure in the ankle and arm, and then compare the two numbers to check if they’re equal. If ankle pressure is half or below arm pressure, it’s likely that the leg arteries have narrowed.

Ultrasound test - to measure the speed of blood flow and structure of leg vessels by using sound waves at a higher frequency than humans can detect, which are reflected back by the arteries and blood cells.

Read less

How are diabetic foot problems detected?

Your doctor should conduct a regular routine for detecting foot problems, specifically for those diagnosed with diabetes. Care and attention should be paid to the shape, skin condition, foot and ankle pulse, sensitivity to vibration and any deformity or joint rigidity.

If a diabetic food problem is found, a patient should be referred to hospital within 24 hours.

A missed diagnosis, failure or delay to refer a patient to a hospital’s specialist diabetic foot care team can rapidly lead to:

  • Spread of infection
  • Severe deterioration
  • Gangrene
  • Amputation of the affected limbs or digits

Should I make a claim?

We recognise that you may be reluctant to criticise the health professionals who have looked after you or your family, but when a patient receives unacceptable treatment, however complicated their underlying health problems may be, they have the right to have their concerns addressed and to receive compensation if they have suffered a significant injury as a result of that treatment.

Clinical negligence claims need to be conducted by specialist lawyers who understand the complexities of the case. Our dedicated team of specialist solicitors has many years of experience in successfully resolving different types of clinical negligence cases. We can help you find out why the system failed to provide the appropriate care at the right time and, crucially, obtain answers and compensation to ensure that your future financial needs arising because of the negligence are met.  These may include treatment, equipment, support and accommodation.

Read less

How can cancer lead to amputation?

Failure to make an early diagnosis of a cancer tumour or is simply misdiagnosed can also mean lead to a high risk of amputation of the diseased organ. The affected area may need to be removed to prevent a malignant tumour very quickly spreading to adjacent parts of the body. 

Limb infections caused by open wound injuries or post-surgery complications can be life-threatening. The failure to promptly diagnose or treat correctly often requires further surgery and can lead to limb amputation.

Lymphoedema - a chronic (long-term) condition caused by a problem with the lymphatic system, which fights infection and drains excess fluid from tissues. The condition can deteriorate unless promptly treated.

Symptoms:

  • Swelling in the body's tissues, usually in the arms or legs.
  • Heaviness, dull pain and difficulty in limb movement.

Gangrene – the death of body tissue, usually in the toes, feet, fingers and hands, caused by loss of blood supply.

Symptoms:

  • Redness, swelling
  • Sores or blisters
  • Loss of sensation or severe pain in the affected area.

Diabetic foot ulcer – an area of broken down skin, usually on the lower leg or feet, which has failed to heal. Caused by high blood sugar levels and nerve damage. Diabetics with reduced nerve functioning are less able to feel sensation from an injury, such as a cut or blister to their feet. Even a mild injury can develop into a foot ulcer.

Symptoms:

  • Blood or pus drainage from the affected area
  • Noticeable lump 
  • Cracked, dry skin
  • Calluses, corns

Peripheral arterial disease – damage or narrowing of the arteries leading to poor circulation of the blood. The body's cells cannot receive the oxygen and nutrients they need from the bloodstream without an adequate blood flow. The affected tissue of the limb dies and infection can set in.

Symptoms

  • Painful cramping in the hip, thigh or calf muscles after activity
  • Leg numbness or weakness
  • Coldness in the lower leg or foot, compared to the other limb
  • Hair loss on legs/feet
  • Brittle, slow-growing toenails
  • Ulcers (open sores) on the feet and legs, which fail to heal
  • Changing skin colour, such as turning pale or blue
  • Shiny skin
  • Muscle deterioration
Read less

In many cases, the loss of a limb occurs because of:

  • Lack of blood supply to the affected limb
  • Failure or delay in properly monitoring any body tissue damage
  • Failure or delay in recognising severe infection.
  • Complex bone fractures and soft tissue injuries often cause permanent disability and require urgent specialist surgery.
  • A delay in receiving treatment can lead to later complications.

If you have suffered a serious injury to an arm or leg as a result of an accident, you expect the hospital to provide you with proper treatment to give you the best chance of recovery.  If you do not receive this and your condition gets worse, and you lose a limb or the function in a limb, you may have a claim for negligence against the hospital. Losing a limb can also have a life-changing, psychological effect upon both you and your family.

Read less
  • Up to 20% of hospital infections each year are the result of a procedure (surgical site infections).
  • 5% of patients undergoing a surgical procedure develop a surgical site infection
  • Nearly half of all amputations are caused by nerve and circulatory problems that could have been prevented.
  • Two-thirds of all delays in lower limb amputations would have been avoided if surgery had been performed on a planned operating list.
  • Fewer than half of patients who needed leg amputation received good care because of a lack of communication between different disciplines and poor teamwork.
  • Around 6,000 new patient referrals to the NHS are for the fitting of a prosthetic limb following an amputation.
  • Around half of amputations are carried out on those aged 65 or over.
  • Twice as many males are amputees than women.                                                        
  • More than half of lower limb amputees had diabetes.
  • Nearly half of all amputations are caused by nerve and circulatory problems, which could have been prevented.
  • Nearly a quarter of patients who should have been given elective amputation, i.e. make the decision themselves, simply underwent emergency surgery.
Read less

To prevent the spread of infection: Serious injury and damage to limb tissue can lead to the rapid spread of infection. Amputation of the affected limb is often the only measure to prevent the spread of further damage to other parts of the body.

A loss of blood supply, known as Ischaemia: Assessment should be made by a specialist within 12 hours of hospital admission and no more than 14 hours from arrival.

Other causes for amputation may include:

  • Severe injury from an accident in a vehicle, workplace machinery or serious burn
  • A cancerous tumour in the bone or muscle of the limb
  • A serious infection that fails to heal despite the use of antibiotics or other treatment
  • A growth or tumour of the nerve tissue called a neuroma

Negligence in treating a serious limb injury, which required an amputation, may be caused by:

  • A delay resulting in surgical complications and/or
  • Infection leading to septicaemia (blood disease)
  • Loss of blood supply and the death of limb tissue.
  • The development of gangrene or mismanagement of diabetes.

For a claim of negligence to be successful, you have to show that:

  • The doctor, surgeon or hospital was in breach of the duty of care you are owed as their patient.
  • The care received fell below the standard that could “reasonably be expected” from an equally qualified specialist in the field.
  • The lack of care led directly to the injury or harm which was a “reasonably foreseeable consequence” of the actions or omissions of the doctor or other person providing the treatment.

When an operation goes wrong or an injury is not properly diagnosed or treated, no amount of compensation will be able to reverse the suffering and distress caused. Vital care, support and specialist equipment will be needed to ensure the best quality of life can be obtained for the victim of an amputated limb.

As experienced clinical negligence specialists, we know that you will want to find out why your surgeon or doctor failed you or a family member in their duty to provide the expected standard of diagnosis, treatment and care.

We ensure your case is properly investigated and your voice heard in order to bring the hospital, health trust or medical practitioner to account for the harm and suffering they have caused and to prevent others from suffering in a similar way.

Your Legal Friend is committed to ensuring victims of clinical negligence obtain answers and receive appropriate compensation so that their future medical treatment, support, equipment and care needs are properly met.

Read less

When performed as a life-saving measure, amputation of a limb is still a traumatic, life-changing experience for anyone to go through. But to discover that an amputation could have been avoided with a proper standard of medical treatment can have a severe psychological impact upon both the patient and their dependents.

If you or a member of your family has suffered an amputation that could have been prevented, you will be trying to come to terms with the shock of what happened. This means seeking an explanation for how such an error was allowed to have taken place.

Patients who suffer from diabetes are at particular risk of an amputated limb if their treatment isn’t properly managed. Irreversible complications can arise from a doctor or specialist who fails to reduce the risk of amputation or fails to provide the best possible course of treatment. 

  • Only one in eight patients with diabetes was admitted under the care of diabetes service.
  • Only six in ten patients with diabetes were reviewed by a diabetes nurse specialist prior to surgery.     

One of the most potentially serious of complications to affect patients with diabetes can be the damage caused to the nerves and blood vessels, which often leads to foot ulcers and a decision to amputate.

  • Foot ulcers affect one in ten diabetics.
  • Around 50 per cent of all amputations conducted in the UK are carried out on people who have diabetes.
Read less

Diabetic vascular problems are also known as peripheral vascular disease – a condition that causes hardening and a subsequent blockage of the arteries.

A number of important diagnostic tests should have been carried out to check for vascular disease. A delay or failure by a doctor, clinician or a diabetics nurse to correctly diagnose, monitor or provide the appropriate standard of diabetic treatment and care can lead to major, life-changing harm and injury.

The partial or total blockage of an artery can prevent an adequate supply of blood to a part of the body - most often the foot – causing ulcers, infection and, in severe cases, tissue death, which requires amputation of the limb.

There can often be a devastating, psychological impact upon both the patient and family if an arm, leg, or even fingers or toes have been removed. This suffering and distress can be further increased if it’s discovered that the loss of a limb could have been prevented if the symptoms of diabetes-related vascular disease had not been missed or treatment delayed.

If you or a member of your family has suffered a preventable amputation, it could take a very long time to come to terms with what has happened, if at all.

Read less

The condition can arise from the onset of Type 2 diabetes and the body’s reduced ability to produce the insulin needed to transport glucose (blood sugar) from the bloodstream into the cells where it’s used to produce energy. As a result, an excess of blood sugar remains in the bloodstream for a longer period, increasing the likelihood that the blood vessel walls will ‘fur up’ and narrow – a condition known as ‘atherosclerosis’.

A lack of blood flow increases the risk of developing foot ulcers and gangrene which is tissue death caused by a lack of oxygen. If you have Type 2 diabetes you also have an increased risk of vascular disease if:

  • You are male
  • You have high blood pressure
  • You have high cholesterol levels
  • You smoke
  • You don't exercise
  • You’re overweight
  • You eat a high-fat diet
  • You suffer from stress
  • You have a family history of vascular disease, angina, heart attacks or stroke
Read less
  • Blurred vision
  • Seeing floating spots– ‘floaters’ – in front of the eyes
  • Swelling of the face or limbs or unexpected weight gain
  • Urine has a “foamy” appearance
  • Foot sores
  • Loss of feeling or a burning feeling in hands or feet
  • Pain in the legs when walking
  • High blood pressure
  • Chest pain

Neuropathy – a nerve condition resulting in a loss of protective sensation in the toes or feet. The inability to feel a cut or sore could lead to a worsening of the condition and the risk of infection. Damaged nerves supplying the foot muscles may not function properly causing the foot to not align properly. Excess pressure on one area of the foot can lead to foot ulcers.

Retinopathy - the abnormal growth of blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensitive membrane at the back of the eye.

Nephropathy - a kidney disease caused by damage to the small blood vessels, which reduces their ability to function efficiently or, in some cases, completely fail.

General health - your GP or a doctor should ask questions concerning your general health, medical history, and symptoms.

Blood test – to measure glucose levels, cholesterol levels, urea – waste product in the urine, creatine - supplies energy to the muscle cells, and the rate at which blood is filtered through the kidneys.

Urine test – to detect micro amounts of a protein, which appear at the early stages of diabetic kidney disease.

Kidney biopsy (if necessary) - to confirm the diagnosis or determine the severity of the disease.

Eye test – to evaluate the blood vessels in your retinas and the presence of a retinopathy

ECG testing – to test the heart’s electrical activity by running/walking on a treadmill

ABI (ankle/brachial index) test - to measure blood pressure in the ankle and arm, and then compare the two numbers to check if they’re equal. If ankle pressure is half or below arm pressure, it’s likely that the leg arteries have narrowed.

Ultrasound test - to measure the speed of blood flow and structure of leg vessels by using sound waves at a higher frequency than humans can detect, which are reflected back by the arteries and blood cells.

Read less

Your doctor should conduct a regular routine for detecting foot problems, specifically for those diagnosed with diabetes. Care and attention should be paid to the shape, skin condition, foot and ankle pulse, sensitivity to vibration and any deformity or joint rigidity.

If a diabetic food problem is found, a patient should be referred to hospital within 24 hours.

A missed diagnosis, failure or delay to refer a patient to a hospital’s specialist diabetic foot care team can rapidly lead to:

  • Spread of infection
  • Severe deterioration
  • Gangrene
  • Amputation of the affected limbs or digits

We recognise that you may be reluctant to criticise the health professionals who have looked after you or your family, but when a patient receives unacceptable treatment, however complicated their underlying health problems may be, they have the right to have their concerns addressed and to receive compensation if they have suffered a significant injury as a result of that treatment.

Clinical negligence claims need to be conducted by specialist lawyers who understand the complexities of the case. Our dedicated team of specialist solicitors has many years of experience in successfully resolving different types of clinical negligence cases. We can help you find out why the system failed to provide the appropriate care at the right time and, crucially, obtain answers and compensation to ensure that your future financial needs arising because of the negligence are met.  These may include treatment, equipment, support and accommodation.

Read less

Failure to make an early diagnosis of a cancer tumour or is simply misdiagnosed can also mean lead to a high risk of amputation of the diseased organ. The affected area may need to be removed to prevent a malignant tumour very quickly spreading to adjacent parts of the body.