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Workplace Vehicles Accident Claims

An injury that involves being hit by a vehicle is almost certain to be serious and, in some cases, life-threatening.

Your Legal Friend client Mr Dowse

They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently.

Mr Dowse
Leeds

Claiming for a workplace vehicle accident

Transport, storage and construction are the industries where you are at most risk of suffering a serious or fatal injury caused by a moving vehicle. Around 2,000 people are seriously injured and 70 lives are lost each year as a result of an accident involving a workplace vehicle, with many of these accidents occurring during deliveries and collections. (Health and Safety Executive).

Ironically, twice as many people are struck by vehicles moving forward than by vehicles reversing, and a similar number are trapped by something collapsing or overturning.

You don’t have to be working in a warehouse, delivery bay or goods yard to be struck by a lorry or by a forklift truck dropping its load. Wherever you work, the consequences of an injury are always likely to be severe and often life-changing.

Drivers or other personnel can be unfairly blamed for accidents that could have been prevented if an employer, site manager or duty holder had put the required safety measures in place. These should include a strict procedure for deliveries and collections, and task-specific movements of vehicles.

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Our expert team will call you...

Alison Saul, Director of Personal Injury leads our Personal Injury and Road Accident teams.   A fully qualified solicitor with over 15 years of experience and expertise, Alison is dedicated to achieving the highest levels of compensation for her clients as well as ensuring high-quality client care.

Workplace vehicle accident claims team

Alison is assisted by her team managers, Philip Waters Lee Quinn, Jenna Hargreaves, and Kathryn Langton.  Philip, Lee, and Jenna lead legal teams focussing on Road Traffic Accident cases while Kathyrn leads our Personal Injury team.  Together they have a wealth of experience in personal injury compensation.

Philip, a qualified solicitor, has over 18 years’ experience in personal injury compensation.  Having previously worked for a large insurance company, he has extensive insights on how to engage effectively with insurers to achieve the level of compensation our clients deserve. Philip deals with cases of high value, complex cases, and recently secured £1.6 million in compensation for one of his clients who suffered catastrophic injuries in a road accident.

Lee has over 15 years’ specialist experience in Personal Injury claims and also manages a wide variety of high value, complex cases. Lee has extensive experience of working with insurance companies, acting for both claimants and defendants, and so understands how to secure the highest levels of compensation for the victims of road traffic accidents.

Jenna is a qualified solicitor and has studied to become a barrister. Jenna leads the internal reviews of our case management processes to ensure excellent, efficient case handling and high levels of client satisfaction.

Kathryn, also a qualified solicitor, specialises in accidents at work, public liability and accidents abroad.  Kathryn deals with a wide variety of cases, often including accidents that involve serious, complex injuries.

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When would you like us to call?

There are many people injured in accidents each year through no fault of their own and the circumstances will be different in each instance. Our team has extensive experience of successfully managing a wide range of personal injury claims, so we can help you secure the maximum compensation you deserve.

Alison Saul

Director of Personal Injury

What our customers say

Mrs. Vora's portrait

“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

A photo of Mr Dowse

“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

Mr Dowse
Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Obtaining a full description of your accident
Step
2
Obtaining your medical records
Step
3
Contacting the company responsible for your accident
Step
4
Arranging your medical assessment
Step
5
Collating details of your financial loss
Step
86
Negotiating the maximum settlement possibleProviding you with our valuation of your losses
Step
7
Sending your valuation to the other party's insurer
Step
68
Providing you with our valuation of your lossesNegotiating the maximum settlement possible
Step
9
Issuing Court proceedings
Step
10
Sending you your compensation payment

Your questions... answered

What are the risks of working with vehicles?

Every day, delivery drivers, warehouse staff, company employees, sub-contractors and visitors are potentially at risk of:

  • Being struck or crushed between moving vehicles
  • Falling from vehicle cabs, tail-lifts or a goods ramp
  • Hit by objects falling from vehicles, such as forklift trucks
  • Vehicles overturning

What is the law on the use of vehicles in the workplace?

A system for deliveries and collections should be organised and strictly enforced to minimise the risk of harm to all staff working in delivery bays and on lorry routes to and from the premises.

Under The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, an employer has a legal responsibility to ensure: "Every workplace shall be organised in such a way that pedestrians and vehicles can circulate in a safe manner."

Is my employer responsible for my safety when using workplace vehicles?

If you are asked to operate a loading vehicle at work such as a forklift, your employer should provide proper training before you are allowed to use it. Forklift accidents can often be caused by a lack of experience with working in a limited space. Incorrect use of a forklift can cause mechanical failure or faults to develop, which result in steering defects and dropped pallets.

If you have been injured by a workplace vehicle, your employer may have failed to observe strict safety procedures. The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 state: "Every workplace shall be organised in such a way that pedestrians and vehicles can circulate in a safe manner."

Under the regulations, your employer has a duty of care in the workplace and should try to ensure that:

  • All staff and vehicles are separated by barriers or a safe distance
  • The need for a vehicle to reverse is minimised
  • Falls from vehicles are reduced
Read less

How can Your Legal Friend help?

Your Legal Friend has over 30 years of experience in helping clients who have suffered an accident at work.

Our in-depth knowledge of workplace law and injury compensation can provide you with all the expert guidance you will need to help you succeed in making your claim. 

We can:

  • help you with medical treatment, rehabilitation and your return to work
  • ensure care and support services are available for the most serious injuries
  • advise you on how to claim for DWP benefits to help you along the way
  • skilfully manage your compensation claim to include:
    • payment for the pain and suffering caused by your injury
    • any financial losses you’ve incurred already, such as lost wages, travel and medical expenses
    • any expenses you may need in the future.

What are the statistics on workplace vehicle accidents?

  • One in eight of all fatal workplace injuries were caused by a vehicle in the workplace
  • 2% of non-fatal workplace injuries were caused by a vehicle in the workplace. (Injury reports – RIDDOR, 2013/14)

What is classed as a workplace vehicle?

A workplace vehicle is defined as any vehicle or piece of mobile equipment used in any work environment. This covers a wide range of vehicles, including:

  • Cars, vans, lorries, forklift or lift trucks
  •  Plant vehicles, such as dumper trucks, lorry loaders, excavators, bulldozers, and overhead moving gantries

Falls from workplace vehicles

Falls from vehicles in the workplace are caused by a number of common reasons, including:

  • Lack of handle grips to assist drivers climbing into and out of lorry cabs
  • Inconsistent heights in the gaps between individual access steps leading to driver’s cab
  • Using inappropriate parts of the vehicle as support
  • Slippery surfaces
  • Uneven ladders or walkways
  • Climbing up on top of loads.

Forklift and pallet trucks

The incorrect or negligent use of a forklift or pallet truck can often cause severe crushing injuries to hands, arms, feet and legs. Lack of training can lead to:

  • Inability to work in a limited space
  • Unsafe manoeuvring, including reversing
  • Crush injuries
  • Dropping loads
  • Mechanical faults.

An employer has a legal duty to provide all employees with a safe work environment or system of work. There is an Approved Code of Practice (ACOP), which sets the minimum standard of basic training that an employee should receive before being allowed to operate individual types of forklift truck.

Read less

What is a workplace traffic route?

Under the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, a ‘traffic route’ is defined as ‘a route for pedestrian traffic, vehicles or both’. The Act also includes any stairs, staircase, a fixed ladder, doorway, gateway, loading bay or ramp.

A workplace traffic route for workplace vehicles should:

  • Be suitable for the people and vehicles using it and organised so  that they can both move around safely
  • Be suitable for purpose – not uneven, potholed, sloped or slippery
  • Provide sufficient separation between vehicles and pedestrians where they share a traffic route
  • Pose no risk to the health or safety of people working near a traffic route
  • Be kept free from obstructions or objects that may cause anyone to slip, trip or fall
  • Have appropriate markings and signs where necessary

How can workplace vehicles be used safely?

Effective ways to keep vehicles separate from pedestrian areas include:

  • Clear markings and signs to set vehicle and pedestrian routes apart
  • Raised kerbs to mark vehicle and pedestrian areas
  • Suitable protective barriers or guard rails, particularly at the entrances and exits to buildings and at the corners of buildings
  • Preventing pedestrians from walking straight onto roads, especially from places where they may not be clearly visible to drivers.

Do outside contractors and agency workers have the same rights?

The same health and safety standards apply to agency workers and contractors as to permanent company employees.  An employer or site operator will need to ensure the contractor is given the appropriate health and safety information on:

  • Workplace layout
  • Routes to be used
  • Vehicles and equipment on site
  • Risks from the activities on site and the controls put in place to mitigate these
  • Other people on site, such as other contractors or visiting drivers.

Do I have a workplace vehicle claim?

Under The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, your employer has a legal responsibility and duty of care in the workplace to try to ensure. 

  • All staff and vehicles are separated by barriers or a safe distance
  • The need for a vehicle to reverse is minimised
  • Falls from vehicles are reduced.

If your employer has been negligent and you have suffered an injury as a result, then you may have a claim for compensation.

Every day, delivery drivers, warehouse staff, company employees, sub-contractors and visitors are potentially at risk of:

  • Being struck or crushed between moving vehicles
  • Falling from vehicle cabs, tail-lifts or a goods ramp
  • Hit by objects falling from vehicles, such as forklift trucks
  • Vehicles overturning

A system for deliveries and collections should be organised and strictly enforced to minimise the risk of harm to all staff working in delivery bays and on lorry routes to and from the premises.

Under The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, an employer has a legal responsibility to ensure: "Every workplace shall be organised in such a way that pedestrians and vehicles can circulate in a safe manner."

If you are asked to operate a loading vehicle at work such as a forklift, your employer should provide proper training before you are allowed to use it. Forklift accidents can often be caused by a lack of experience with working in a limited space. Incorrect use of a forklift can cause mechanical failure or faults to develop, which result in steering defects and dropped pallets.

If you have been injured by a workplace vehicle, your employer may have failed to observe strict safety procedures. The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 state: "Every workplace shall be organised in such a way that pedestrians and vehicles can circulate in a safe manner."

Under the regulations, your employer has a duty of care in the workplace and should try to ensure that:

  • All staff and vehicles are separated by barriers or a safe distance
  • The need for a vehicle to reverse is minimised
  • Falls from vehicles are reduced
Read less

Your Legal Friend has over 30 years of experience in helping clients who have suffered an accident at work.

Our in-depth knowledge of workplace law and injury compensation can provide you with all the expert guidance you will need to help you succeed in making your claim. 

We can:

  • help you with medical treatment, rehabilitation and your return to work
  • ensure care and support services are available for the most serious injuries
  • advise you on how to claim for DWP benefits to help you along the way
  • skilfully manage your compensation claim to include:
    • payment for the pain and suffering caused by your injury
    • any financial losses you’ve incurred already, such as lost wages, travel and medical expenses
    • any expenses you may need in the future.
  • One in eight of all fatal workplace injuries were caused by a vehicle in the workplace
  • 2% of non-fatal workplace injuries were caused by a vehicle in the workplace. (Injury reports – RIDDOR, 2013/14)

A workplace vehicle is defined as any vehicle or piece of mobile equipment used in any work environment. This covers a wide range of vehicles, including:

  • Cars, vans, lorries, forklift or lift trucks
  •  Plant vehicles, such as dumper trucks, lorry loaders, excavators, bulldozers, and overhead moving gantries

Falls from workplace vehicles

Falls from vehicles in the workplace are caused by a number of common reasons, including:

  • Lack of handle grips to assist drivers climbing into and out of lorry cabs
  • Inconsistent heights in the gaps between individual access steps leading to driver’s cab
  • Using inappropriate parts of the vehicle as support
  • Slippery surfaces
  • Uneven ladders or walkways
  • Climbing up on top of loads.

Forklift and pallet trucks

The incorrect or negligent use of a forklift or pallet truck can often cause severe crushing injuries to hands, arms, feet and legs. Lack of training can lead to:

  • Inability to work in a limited space
  • Unsafe manoeuvring, including reversing
  • Crush injuries
  • Dropping loads
  • Mechanical faults.

An employer has a legal duty to provide all employees with a safe work environment or system of work. There is an Approved Code of Practice (ACOP), which sets the minimum standard of basic training that an employee should receive before being allowed to operate individual types of forklift truck.

Read less

Under the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, a ‘traffic route’ is defined as ‘a route for pedestrian traffic, vehicles or both’. The Act also includes any stairs, staircase, a fixed ladder, doorway, gateway, loading bay or ramp.

A workplace traffic route for workplace vehicles should:

  • Be suitable for the people and vehicles using it and organised so  that they can both move around safely
  • Be suitable for purpose – not uneven, potholed, sloped or slippery
  • Provide sufficient separation between vehicles and pedestrians where they share a traffic route
  • Pose no risk to the health or safety of people working near a traffic route
  • Be kept free from obstructions or objects that may cause anyone to slip, trip or fall
  • Have appropriate markings and signs where necessary

Effective ways to keep vehicles separate from pedestrian areas include:

  • Clear markings and signs to set vehicle and pedestrian routes apart
  • Raised kerbs to mark vehicle and pedestrian areas
  • Suitable protective barriers or guard rails, particularly at the entrances and exits to buildings and at the corners of buildings
  • Preventing pedestrians from walking straight onto roads, especially from places where they may not be clearly visible to drivers.

The same health and safety standards apply to agency workers and contractors as to permanent company employees.  An employer or site operator will need to ensure the contractor is given the appropriate health and safety information on:

  • Workplace layout
  • Routes to be used
  • Vehicles and equipment on site
  • Risks from the activities on site and the controls put in place to mitigate these
  • Other people on site, such as other contractors or visiting drivers.

Under The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, your employer has a legal responsibility and duty of care in the workplace to try to ensure. 

  • All staff and vehicles are separated by barriers or a safe distance
  • The need for a vehicle to reverse is minimised
  • Falls from vehicles are reduced.

If your employer has been negligent and you have suffered an injury as a result, then you may have a claim for compensation.