8.5 | 117 Reviews
Call us
0151 550 5228
Track Your Claim

Electrical accidents

Your guide to claiming compensation for an injury caused by a workplace electrical accident

Your Legal Friend client Mr Dowse

They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently.

Mr Dowse
Leeds

Electrical accidents explained

Your employer has a legal duty of care to keep employees “as safe as practicably possible” from the risk of accident or injury whilst at work.  However negligence or a failure to comply with regulations can often mean that electrical equipment has not been regularly or adequately checked, or maintained.

You could be at further risk of inhaling noxious chemical fumes if an electrical fault starts a fire or causes an explosion. A power-socket may not be securely attached to the wall, a plug may contain the wrong fuse rating or the wires may have become loose. Kitchen appliances, power tools and other equipment in continuous use at work may have electrical faults which have gone unchecked.

If you have good grounds to believe that you have been injured because your employer failed in their legal responsibility to comply with workplace regulations, you may decide to pursue a claim for compensation.

Your Legal Friend has an in-depth knowledge of workplace law and injury compensation and over 30 years of experience in successfully managing workplace compensation claims. We can provide you with all the expert guidance you will need to help you make your case and secure the best possible settlement. 

Read less

air_conditioning_unit.jpg

Our expert team will call you...

Alison Saul, Director of Personal Injury leads our Personal Injury and Road Accident teams. A fully qualified solicitor with over 15 years of experience and expertise, Alison is dedicated to achieving the highest levels of compensation for her clients as well as ensuring high quality client care.

Our work accident claims expert team.

Alison is assisted by her team managers, Philip Waters Lee Quinn, Jenna Hargreaves, and Kathryn Langton. Philip, Lee, and Jenna lead legal teams focussing on Road Traffic Accident cases while Kathyrn leads our Personal Injury team. Together they have a wealth of experience in personal injury compensation.

Philip, a qualified solicitor, has over 18 years’ experience in personal injury compensation. Having previously worked for a large insurance company, he has extensive insights in how to engage effectively with insurers to achieve the level of compensation our clients deserve. Philip deals with cases of high value, complex cases, and recently secured £1.6 million in compensation for one of his clients who suffered catastrophic injuries in a road accident.

Lee has over 15 years’ specialist experience in Personal Injury claims and also manages a wide variety of high value, complex cases. Lee has extensive experience of working with insurance companies, acting for both claimants and defendants, and so understands how to secure the highest levels of compensation for the victims of road traffic accidents.

Jenna is a qualified solicitor and has studied to become a barrister. Jenna leads the internal reviews of our case management processes to ensure excellent, efficient case handling and high levels of client satisfaction.

Kathryn, also a qualified solicitor, specialises in accidents at work, public liability and accidents abroad. Kathryn deals with a wide variety of cases, often including accidents that involve serious, complex injuries.

Read less

Request a callback that suits you

When would you like us to call?

There are many people injured in accidents each year through no fault of their own and the circumstances will be different in each instance. Our team has extensive experience of successfully managing a wide range of personal injury claims, so we can help you secure the maximum compensation you deserve.

Alison Saul

Director of Personal Injury

What our customers say

Mrs. Vora's portrait

“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

A photo of Mr Dowse

“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

Mr Dowse
Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Obtaining a full description of your accident
Step
2
Obtaining your medical records
Step
3
Contacting the company responsible for your accident
Step
4
Arranging your medical assessment
Step
5
Collating details of your financial loss
Step
86
Negotiating the maximum settlement possibleProviding you with our valuation of your losses
Step
7
Sending your valuation to the other party's insurer
Step
68
Providing you with our valuation of your lossesNegotiating the maximum settlement possible
Step
9
Issuing Court proceedings
Step
10
Sending you your compensation payment

Your questions... answered

Who is most at risk of suffering an electrical accident at work?

Employees who are more at risk of an injury because they use electrical appliances every day in their place of work include:

  • Catering / kitchen staff
  • Cleaners
  • Construction/maintenance workers
  • Electricians / electrical installers
  • Hairdressers
  • Hospital/care home staff
  • Maintenance workers
  • Office workers
  • Theatre production staff

What are the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989?

The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 states that any electrical equipment with the potential to cause injury must be maintained in a safe condition.

Most electrical accidents occur because people are working on or near equipment that is unsafe including:

  • Faulty
  • Power socket loosely attached to wall or machinery
  • Internal wiring no longer makes secure connection
  • Wiring exposed
  • Incorrectly wired or fused
  • Thought to be ‘dead’ but is actually ‘live’

An electrical shock may cause more severe harm than may be generally realised, including:

  • Muscle spasms
  • Nerve damage
  • Fractured bones
  • Cardiac arrest

An electrical shock can also result in complications, which could mean long term physical problems.  

Read less

Is my employer responsible for PAT testing workplace equipment?

Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) is the approved examination and testing of an individual electrical appliance or item of equipment, which is passed and labelled for safe use.

A basic inspection list includes the assessment of:

  • Cable sheath damage
  • Power plug damage
  • Coloured insulation of internal cable cores to show where they enter power plug 
  • Damage to equipment external casing, loose screws or parts
  • Evidence of overheating
  • Damaged or incorrectly operating main on/off switches.

Under the Health and Safety Act of 1974, employers have a duty of care to ensure that the necessary health and safety precautions are taken in the handling of electrical equipment in the workplace.

Your employer may be liable if you suffered an injury caused by an electrical accident, which could have been prevented if the regulations had been enforced.

 

Employees who are more at risk of an injury because they use electrical appliances every day in their place of work include:

  • Catering / kitchen staff
  • Cleaners
  • Construction/maintenance workers
  • Electricians / electrical installers
  • Hairdressers
  • Hospital/care home staff
  • Maintenance workers
  • Office workers
  • Theatre production staff

The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 states that any electrical equipment with the potential to cause injury must be maintained in a safe condition.

Most electrical accidents occur because people are working on or near equipment that is unsafe including:

  • Faulty
  • Power socket loosely attached to wall or machinery
  • Internal wiring no longer makes secure connection
  • Wiring exposed
  • Incorrectly wired or fused
  • Thought to be ‘dead’ but is actually ‘live’

An electrical shock may cause more severe harm than may be generally realised, including:

  • Muscle spasms
  • Nerve damage
  • Fractured bones
  • Cardiac arrest

An electrical shock can also result in complications, which could mean long term physical problems.  

Read less

Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) is the approved examination and testing of an individual electrical appliance or item of equipment, which is passed and labelled for safe use.

A basic inspection list includes the assessment of:

  • Cable sheath damage
  • Power plug damage
  • Coloured insulation of internal cable cores to show where they enter power plug 
  • Damage to equipment external casing, loose screws or parts
  • Evidence of overheating
  • Damaged or incorrectly operating main on/off switches.

Under the Health and Safety Act of 1974, employers have a duty of care to ensure that the necessary health and safety precautions are taken in the handling of electrical equipment in the workplace.

Your employer may be liable if you suffered an injury caused by an electrical accident, which could have been prevented if the regulations had been enforced.