8.5 | 117 Reviews
Call us
0151 550 5228
Track Your Claim

Building and construction sites

Your guide to accidents on building and construction sites

Your Legal Friend client Mr Dowse

They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently.

Mr Dowse
Leeds

Construction site accidents explained

Despite a significant reduction in the number and rate of injuries on building and construction sites over the last twenty years or more, according to The Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the construction industry remains a high risk industry for accidents at work. One in every hundred construction workers suffers a serious injury each year on a building site (HSE, 2014) and construction site workers have the highest risk of a serious, life-changing injury.

You are more likely to have an accident or serious injury if you work on a small building site.  The most frequent types of accidents on building sites are falling from height, slips and trips, or being struck by a moving object.

If you work in construction you expect that a building site will have regulations in place to prevent the risk of you having an avoidable accident. Unfortunately, two in five building sites “fail to properly protect workers”, according to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE, 2013/14).

Our expert team will call you...

Alison Saul, Director of Personal Injury leads our Personal Injury and Road Accident teams.   A fully qualified solicitor with over 15 years of experience and expertise, Alison is dedicated to achieving the highest levels of compensation for her clients as well as ensuring high-quality client care.

Building site injury claims team

Alison is assisted by her team managers, Philip Waters Lee Quinn, Jenna Hargreaves, and Kathryn Langton.  Philip, Lee, and Jenna lead legal teams focussing on Road Traffic Accident cases while Kathyrn leads our Personal Injury team.  Together they have a wealth of experience in personal injury compensation.

Philip, a qualified solicitor, has over 18 years’ experience in personal injury compensation.  Having previously worked for a large insurance company, he has extensive insights on how to engage effectively with insurers to achieve the level of compensation our clients deserve. Philip deals with cases of high value, complex cases, and recently secured £1.6 million in compensation for one of his clients who suffered catastrophic injuries in a road accident.

Lee has over 15 years’ specialist experience in Personal Injury claims and also manages a wide variety of high value, complex cases. Lee has extensive experience of working with insurance companies, acting for both claimants and defendants, and so understands how to secure the highest levels of compensation for the victims of road traffic accidents.

Jenna is a qualified solicitor and has studied to become a barrister. Jenna leads the internal reviews of our case management processes to ensure excellent, efficient case handling and high levels of client satisfaction.

Kathryn, also a qualified solicitor, specialises in accidents at work, public liability and accidents abroad.  Kathryn deals with a wide variety of cases, often including accidents that involve serious, complex injuries.

Read less

Request a callback that suits you

When would you like us to call?

There are many people injured in accidents each year through no fault of their own and the circumstances will be different in each instance. Our team has extensive experience of successfully managing a wide range of personal injury claims, so we can help you secure the maximum compensation you deserve.

Alison Saul

Director of Personal Injury

What our customers say

Mrs. Vora's portrait

“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

A photo of Mr Dowse

“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

Mr Dowse
Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Obtaining a full description of your accident
Step
2
Obtaining your medical records
Step
3
Contacting the company responsible for your accident
Step
4
Arranging your medical assessment
Step
5
Collating details of your financial loss
Step
86
Negotiating the maximum settlement possibleProviding you with our valuation of your losses
Step
7
Sending your valuation to the other party's insurer
Step
68
Providing you with our valuation of your lossesNegotiating the maximum settlement possible
Step
9
Issuing Court proceedings
Step
10
Sending you your compensation payment

Your questions... answered

What are the common risks on construction sites?

There are many hazards that sites continually overlook, from exposure to dangerous types of dust to inadequate washing facilities. Among the most common areas of site risk are:

  • Lack of edge protection on stairwells and scaffolding
  • Unsafe storage of flammable materials
  • Inadequate personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Defective scaffolds
  • Failure of hoists or safety harnesses
  • Roofs, holes or trenches not fenced off or supported
  • Forklift or dumper truck incidents
  • Chemical spillage
  • Equipment or tool malfunctions
  • Insufficient or no safety briefings

Lorries, dumper trucks and heavy machinery driving across uneven ground are also potential accident flashpoints, which require the strict enforcement of health and safety rules to avoid a serious or fatal injury.

What are your employer’s responsibilities?

All employers have a duty of care to protect all employees, contractors and visitors on a construction site.  This should always include the compulsory wearing and use of safety wear and fully functional personal protective equipment, such as hard hats, safety boots, hi-vis jackets, safety glasses and ear defenders.

Among the key areas of legal responsibility are the carrying out and constant updating of risk assessments and safe working methods, communicated in writing to “all who need to know.”

If your employer fails to comply with legislation to prevent an accident and you are injured at work, you may be able to pursue a claim.

Under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015), a site contractor has a legal duty to:

  • Plan, manage and monitor all work carried out by themselves and their workers
  • Take into account the risks to anyone who might be affected by the work (including members of the public)
  • Put in place the measures needed to provide protection.

The basic guidelines are to:

  • Plan and manage risk from start to finish
  • Coordinate and communicate effectively all risks, works and information with those who need to know.

All employers have a duty of care to protect everyone on a construction site, including: 

  • Employees
  • Self-employed
  • Contractors
  • Sub-contractors
  • Delivery drivers
  • Site visitors
Read less

What are the most common building site dangers?

A lack of adequate site management and control can often be responsible for a failure to remove hazards or enforce safety measures. Small firm employers can be wilfully negligent and flout the required procedures. Official site inspections often report the following site dangers:

  • Lack of edge protection on roofs and scaffolding
  • Equipment / tool malfunctions
  • Hoist or safety harnesses failure
  • Moving vehicles

One third of accidents on building sites involve site dumpers and vehicles reversing (HSE). Often a combination of poor planning and inadequate separation of pedestrians and vehicles can cause vehicles or their loads to strike on-site workers and obstructions, particularly when reversing.

The most notable areas of negligence are repeatedly found to be:

  • Failures to properly protect workers during construction activities at height
  • Inadequate site management
  • Exposure to dangerous types of dust
  • Inadequate washing facilities

Smaller building firms often consistently fail to observe basic safety procedures or comply with regulations according to the HSE’s “Unannounced Site Inspections” 9th Report, Sep/Oct 2014.

Whether you work with a small building firm or a larger construction company, you are always owed a legal duty of care to ensure your safety and protection at all times. If you have been involved in an accident or suffered an injury on a building site because of unsafe conditions, you may be off work or no longer be able to return to your former trade.

Read less

What does the Regulation 36 of The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 (CDM) require?

The Regulation 36 of The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 (CDM) requires that:

“Every construction site shall be organised in such a way that, so far as is reasonably practicable, pedestrians and vehicles can move safely.”

Site contractors have a duty to protect all on-site personnel from the risk of being struck by a vehicle. A safe system should be put into place to ensure:

  • Pedestrian-only areas where vehicles are completely excluded
  • Vehicle-only areas, especially where space is limited or traffic is heavy
  • Signposted safe pedestrian routes to work
  • Safe vehicle routes around the site
  • Personal protection equipment (PPE)

Almost all the large construction sites will display large signs to notify personnel that they must wear the basic standard of PPE before they are allowed to enter the site:

  • Safety hard hat
  • Steel toe-capped safety boots
  • High visibility jacket

In many cases, there will also be a requirement to wear safety glasses and ear defenders, which can be supplied attached to a safety hard hat.

Under the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992, an employer has a legal duty to ensure protective equipment is supplied and used wherever there are unavoidable risks in carrying out tasks in the workplace.

Read less

What are my employers responsibilities when it comes to their onsite facilities?

The basic welfare of people working on site can often be simply neglected, and may be a cause of health or hygiene issues.

Site management is responsible for personnel welfare and the provision of essential facilities maintained to regulation standards.

  • Toilets should be readily available, kept clean and properly lit
  • Washbasins should have hot and cold (or warm) running water, soap and towels.

What are the responsibilities of small building firms?

A small builder is generally defined as an individual who carries out work on:

  • Private, domestic projects -  extensions, repairs and refurbishment work
  • Smaller business projects - short duration repairs and refurbishment involving less than 30 days of construction work.

An employer of a small building firm must comply with the regulations to ensure the safety of his workforce and members of the public when working on all and every type of residential or small commercial project.

Under the law, a builder has the main duties to:

  • Prevent hazards and risks by planning, managing and monitoring to ensure all construction work can be safely carried out
  • Put in place precautions and specific site rules  
  • Ensure that the workforce is adequately trained
  • Give appropriate information on potential risks and hazards
  • Co-operate with the client/homeowner to ensure site safety
Read less

What are the main types of accidents on construction sites?

Many people are injured in the construction industry when they fall from height, for example they may be working up ladders or scaffolding. Injuries associated from falls from height can be quite wide ranging, anything from cuts and bruises to strains and sprains or broken bones, head injuries to catastrophic injuries.

Some falls from height can tragically result in death where the impact on family members is of course devastating. About 34% of on the job deaths happen this way.

Slips and trips are also common, caused by stray tools and equipment, and holes in the ground, or other hazards lying around.

Electrocutions, fires and explosions are also common because construction sites are works in progress and often there is loose wiring, unfinished piping and leaking gases.

If you’ve been injured on a construction site, you may have a claim against either the employer or the contractor. Your employer or contractor has a duty to look after your health, safety and welfare, and if they fail to carry out risk assessments, fail to carry out training, or fail to provide protective equipment, and made you unsafe at work, then you may have a claim against them.

If you’re an employed contractor working on the site of another, the person responsible for your health and safety and welfare will be your own employer, but additionally the contractor upon whose site you are working will also have a duty to look after you and keep you safe.

Read less

How can I claim?

If you can show that your employer or contractor was negligent, then you need also to prove that your condition or injury was a result of that negligence.

You should make sure that the accident is recorded in the Accident Book at work, reported to the supervisor or foreman on the construction site, and you should also see your GP for medical attention.

We can help you with a claim by obtaining medical records and also occupational health records.  We’ll also obtain medical report to confirm that your injuries have been caused as a direct result of negligence in work.

Do time limits apply?

Any claimant has 3 years from the date of the accident in order to bring a claim.  You should always make sure you consult specialist solicitors so that we can advise you about all the evidence we need in order to make your claim successful.

Will it cost me anything to make a claim?

Here at Your Legal Friend we’ll advise you on a No Win,  No Fee basis.  Our initial consultation is free of charge in any event and we will always discuss our terms and conditions with you right from the outset so that you never need worry about any surprises.

How much will I receive?

You should be able to claim compensation for the injuries you’ve received, both physical and any psychological injuries as a result of everything you’ve been through.

The award for compensation for your injuries will be based on the medical evidence we receive in relation to your case and we’ll also look to claim financial losses for you both past and in the future. We’ll compile a schedule of financial loss, so it is helpful if you can keep receipts for things like travel or medical expenses, but we’ll also look to loss of earnings, both past and in future, if you’re not able to work straight away.

And we’ll include the cost of care provided by friends and family for doing things for you that you are unable to do yourself as a direct result of the injuries you’ve suffered.

Read less

There are many hazards that sites continually overlook, from exposure to dangerous types of dust to inadequate washing facilities. Among the most common areas of site risk are:

  • Lack of edge protection on stairwells and scaffolding
  • Unsafe storage of flammable materials
  • Inadequate personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Defective scaffolds
  • Failure of hoists or safety harnesses
  • Roofs, holes or trenches not fenced off or supported
  • Forklift or dumper truck incidents
  • Chemical spillage
  • Equipment or tool malfunctions
  • Insufficient or no safety briefings

Lorries, dumper trucks and heavy machinery driving across uneven ground are also potential accident flashpoints, which require the strict enforcement of health and safety rules to avoid a serious or fatal injury.

All employers have a duty of care to protect all employees, contractors and visitors on a construction site.  This should always include the compulsory wearing and use of safety wear and fully functional personal protective equipment, such as hard hats, safety boots, hi-vis jackets, safety glasses and ear defenders.

Among the key areas of legal responsibility are the carrying out and constant updating of risk assessments and safe working methods, communicated in writing to “all who need to know.”

If your employer fails to comply with legislation to prevent an accident and you are injured at work, you may be able to pursue a claim.

Under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015), a site contractor has a legal duty to:

  • Plan, manage and monitor all work carried out by themselves and their workers
  • Take into account the risks to anyone who might be affected by the work (including members of the public)
  • Put in place the measures needed to provide protection.

The basic guidelines are to:

  • Plan and manage risk from start to finish
  • Coordinate and communicate effectively all risks, works and information with those who need to know.

All employers have a duty of care to protect everyone on a construction site, including: 

  • Employees
  • Self-employed
  • Contractors
  • Sub-contractors
  • Delivery drivers
  • Site visitors
Read less

A lack of adequate site management and control can often be responsible for a failure to remove hazards or enforce safety measures. Small firm employers can be wilfully negligent and flout the required procedures. Official site inspections often report the following site dangers:

  • Lack of edge protection on roofs and scaffolding
  • Equipment / tool malfunctions
  • Hoist or safety harnesses failure
  • Moving vehicles

One third of accidents on building sites involve site dumpers and vehicles reversing (HSE). Often a combination of poor planning and inadequate separation of pedestrians and vehicles can cause vehicles or their loads to strike on-site workers and obstructions, particularly when reversing.

The most notable areas of negligence are repeatedly found to be:

  • Failures to properly protect workers during construction activities at height
  • Inadequate site management
  • Exposure to dangerous types of dust
  • Inadequate washing facilities

Smaller building firms often consistently fail to observe basic safety procedures or comply with regulations according to the HSE’s “Unannounced Site Inspections” 9th Report, Sep/Oct 2014.

Whether you work with a small building firm or a larger construction company, you are always owed a legal duty of care to ensure your safety and protection at all times. If you have been involved in an accident or suffered an injury on a building site because of unsafe conditions, you may be off work or no longer be able to return to your former trade.

Read less

The Regulation 36 of The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 (CDM) requires that:

“Every construction site shall be organised in such a way that, so far as is reasonably practicable, pedestrians and vehicles can move safely.”

Site contractors have a duty to protect all on-site personnel from the risk of being struck by a vehicle. A safe system should be put into place to ensure:

  • Pedestrian-only areas where vehicles are completely excluded
  • Vehicle-only areas, especially where space is limited or traffic is heavy
  • Signposted safe pedestrian routes to work
  • Safe vehicle routes around the site
  • Personal protection equipment (PPE)

Almost all the large construction sites will display large signs to notify personnel that they must wear the basic standard of PPE before they are allowed to enter the site:

  • Safety hard hat
  • Steel toe-capped safety boots
  • High visibility jacket

In many cases, there will also be a requirement to wear safety glasses and ear defenders, which can be supplied attached to a safety hard hat.

Under the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992, an employer has a legal duty to ensure protective equipment is supplied and used wherever there are unavoidable risks in carrying out tasks in the workplace.

Read less

The basic welfare of people working on site can often be simply neglected, and may be a cause of health or hygiene issues.

Site management is responsible for personnel welfare and the provision of essential facilities maintained to regulation standards.

  • Toilets should be readily available, kept clean and properly lit
  • Washbasins should have hot and cold (or warm) running water, soap and towels.

A small builder is generally defined as an individual who carries out work on:

  • Private, domestic projects -  extensions, repairs and refurbishment work
  • Smaller business projects - short duration repairs and refurbishment involving less than 30 days of construction work.

An employer of a small building firm must comply with the regulations to ensure the safety of his workforce and members of the public when working on all and every type of residential or small commercial project.

Under the law, a builder has the main duties to:

  • Prevent hazards and risks by planning, managing and monitoring to ensure all construction work can be safely carried out
  • Put in place precautions and specific site rules  
  • Ensure that the workforce is adequately trained
  • Give appropriate information on potential risks and hazards
  • Co-operate with the client/homeowner to ensure site safety
Read less

Many people are injured in the construction industry when they fall from height, for example they may be working up ladders or scaffolding. Injuries associated from falls from height can be quite wide ranging, anything from cuts and bruises to strains and sprains or broken bones, head injuries to catastrophic injuries.

Some falls from height can tragically result in death where the impact on family members is of course devastating. About 34% of on the job deaths happen this way.

Slips and trips are also common, caused by stray tools and equipment, and holes in the ground, or other hazards lying around.

Electrocutions, fires and explosions are also common because construction sites are works in progress and often there is loose wiring, unfinished piping and leaking gases.

If you’ve been injured on a construction site, you may have a claim against either the employer or the contractor. Your employer or contractor has a duty to look after your health, safety and welfare, and if they fail to carry out risk assessments, fail to carry out training, or fail to provide protective equipment, and made you unsafe at work, then you may have a claim against them.

If you’re an employed contractor working on the site of another, the person responsible for your health and safety and welfare will be your own employer, but additionally the contractor upon whose site you are working will also have a duty to look after you and keep you safe.

Read less

If you can show that your employer or contractor was negligent, then you need also to prove that your condition or injury was a result of that negligence.

You should make sure that the accident is recorded in the Accident Book at work, reported to the supervisor or foreman on the construction site, and you should also see your GP for medical attention.

We can help you with a claim by obtaining medical records and also occupational health records.  We’ll also obtain medical report to confirm that your injuries have been caused as a direct result of negligence in work.

Any claimant has 3 years from the date of the accident in order to bring a claim.  You should always make sure you consult specialist solicitors so that we can advise you about all the evidence we need in order to make your claim successful.

Here at Your Legal Friend we’ll advise you on a No Win,  No Fee basis.  Our initial consultation is free of charge in any event and we will always discuss our terms and conditions with you right from the outset so that you never need worry about any surprises.

You should be able to claim compensation for the injuries you’ve received, both physical and any psychological injuries as a result of everything you’ve been through.

The award for compensation for your injuries will be based on the medical evidence we receive in relation to your case and we’ll also look to claim financial losses for you both past and in the future. We’ll compile a schedule of financial loss, so it is helpful if you can keep receipts for things like travel or medical expenses, but we’ll also look to loss of earnings, both past and in future, if you’re not able to work straight away.

And we’ll include the cost of care provided by friends and family for doing things for you that you are unable to do yourself as a direct result of the injuries you’ve suffered.

Read less