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Work Amputation Injuries

Traumatic amputation and damaged limb amputation.

A photo of Mrs Swaffield

I am very happy and satisfied with the settlement you achieved for me and the service was excellent and thank you very much

Mrs E.Swaffield
Loughborough

Making a claim for a work amputation injury

A severe arm or leg injury caused by an accident at work may sometimes present both the doctor and injured patient with no other choice than to amputate the damaged limb.  Traumatic amputations can happen in work-related accidents in any event, depending on the nature of the accident that’s occurred.

Amputation of a limb is a catastrophic and traumatic, life-changing event with long-term to life-long consequences. No amount of compensation will be able to reverse the suffering and stress caused to the victim and their family.

After the amputation, there will be many months or even years of rehabilitation, often with therapy or counselling to help come to terms with the loss. A complete readjustment will be needed to cope with restricted movement, the use of support aids and appliances, and the possibility of having to learn how to use a prosthetic limb where appropriate. Amputations, especially above the knee, can often lead to additional complications. 

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Alison Saul, Director of Personal Injury leads our Personal Injury and Road Accident teams.   A fully qualified solicitor with over 15 years of experience and expertise, Alison is dedicated to achieving the highest levels of compensation for her clients as well as ensuring high-quality client care.

Work amputation injury claims team

Alison is assisted by her team managers, Philip Waters Lee Quinn, Jenna Hargreaves, and Kathryn Langton.  Philip, Lee, and Jenna lead legal teams focussing on Road Traffic Accident cases while Kathyrn leads our Personal Injury team.  Together they have a wealth of experience in personal injury compensation.

Philip, a qualified solicitor, has over 18 years’ experience in personal injury compensation.  Having previously worked for a large insurance company, he has extensive insights on how to engage effectively with insurers to achieve the level of compensation our clients deserve. Philip deals with cases of high value, complex cases, and recently secured £1.6 million in compensation for one of his clients who suffered catastrophic injuries in a road accident.

Lee has over 15 years’ specialist experience in Personal Injury claims and also manages a wide variety of high value, complex cases. Lee has extensive experience of working with insurance companies, acting for both claimants and defendants, and so understands how to secure the highest levels of compensation for the victims of road traffic accidents.

Jenna is a qualified solicitor and has studied to become a barrister. Jenna leads the internal reviews of our case management processes to ensure excellent, efficient case handling and high levels of client satisfaction.

Kathryn, also a qualified solicitor, specialises in accidents at work, public liability and accidents abroad.  Kathryn deals with a wide variety of cases, often including accidents that involve serious, complex injuries.

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There are many people injured in accidents each year through no fault of their own and the circumstances will be different in each instance. Our team has extensive experience of successfully managing a wide range of personal injury claims, so we can help you secure the maximum compensation you deserve.

Alison Saul

Director of Personal Injury

What our customers say

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“I found the staff to be friendly, helpful, courteous and they kept me well informed on a regular basis”

Mrs. Vora,
Loughborough

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“They acted in a sympathetic and professional manner and resolved my case very efficiently”

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Leeds

  For a confidential chat, call one of our experts today 0151 550 5228

10 simple steps to claim

Step
1
Obtaining a full description of your accident
Step
2
Obtaining your medical records
Step
3
Contacting the company responsible for your accident
Step
4
Arranging your medical assessment
Step
5
Collating details of your financial loss
Step
86
Negotiating the maximum settlement possibleProviding you with our valuation of your losses
Step
7
Sending your valuation to the other party's insurer
Step
68
Providing you with our valuation of your lossesNegotiating the maximum settlement possible
Step
9
Issuing Court proceedings
Step
10
Sending you your compensation payment

Your questions... answered

What types of accident might lead to amputation?

The most frequently reported serious injuries that lead to an amputation occur when:

  • Fingers, a hand or an entire upper arm becomes trapped and pulled into machinery with missing, faulty or disabled safety guards.
  • Feet, shins or thighs are struck or crushed between moving vehicles, forklift trucks or other mobile machinery, such as conveyor belts.

In some cases, the outcome can be fatal but most serious injuries result in a change of job or being forced to leave the workplace altogether. The impact on immediate earnings and longer-term financial security can often add to a deepening anxiety and cause psychological problems.

What are the employer’s responsibilities?

Every employer has a legal responsibility to provide a ‘duty of care’ to all employees, contractors and visitors in the workplace. This must include:

  • A safe work environment
  • Risk assessments
  • Machinery, equipment and tools maintained to the required safety standards
  • Adequate training
  • Personal protection equipment (PPE) and safety wear

Your employer can be held responsible for a breach in the regulations that govern health and safety in the workplace, which led to a catastrophic injury and the need for an amputation.

What are the stats on amputation injury?

There were 19,707 major injuries to employees, including amputations, fractures and burns in 2012/13.

What are some causes of amputation?

Traumatic amputation 

When a sudden and unexpected event occurs, which causes a limb to be violently torn away, the outcome is known as a ‘traumatic amputation’.  There are four main types of traumatic amputation:

  • Mechanical – most traumatic amputations are mechanical, caused by workplace machinery
  • Chemical – contact with corrosive chemicals
  • Electrical – a high voltage electric shock
  • Thermal – extreme levels of heat.

It may be possible to re-attach a partly severed or, possibly, a fully severed limb.  However, in the most serious cases when a traumatically injured limb cannot be saved, often because of severe blood vessel damage and tissue death, a prosthetic limb will usually be fitted.

Surgery is performed to shape the bone in the remaining limb and clean the wound, which can involve skin grafts. More than one procedure may be needed to prepare for fitting a prosthetic limb.

Surgical amputation

These amputations are performed by a doctor and may be the only option where a severe injury is caused by an accident at work, such as:

  • Crushing injuries
  • Blast injuries
  • Severe burns
  • Burns from acid or dangerous chemicals
  • If a serious limb injury is not treated promptly, there may be further complications caused by infection.
Read less

What are the most common types of amputation injury?

The most frequently reported serious injuries that lead to a surgical amputation are when fingers, a hand or an entire upper arm become trapped and pulled into machinery with missing, faulty or disabled safety guards. This is one of the most frequent and regular causes of serious injury and amputation.

In a number of cases, the guard has been disabled so any blockage that could slow or hold up production can be quickly cleared by an operator without following the necessary safety precautions that had been intended to prevent the risk of an accident.

Sometimes the guards are not re-attached following machine maintenance, service or repair. Feet, shins or thighs are struck or crushed between moving vehicles, forklift trucks or other mobile machinery.

What are the names for different types of amputation injury?

A specific type of amputation is classified by the part of the body that is removed.  This applies to both traumatic and surgical amputations.

Upper limb amputation – the arms, hands or fingers.

  • Shoulder disarticulation – entire arm at shoulder level and through the shoulder.
  • Forequarter amputation – an entire arm at the shoulder, including removal of the shoulder and part of the shoulder blade and collarbone.
  • Trans-humeral amputation (above the elbow) – upper arm between the shoulder and the elbow, where the use of the shoulder is preserved.
  • Elbow disarticulation – through the elbow joint.
  • Transradial amputation (below the elbow) – through the forearm between the elbow and hand, where the use of the elbow is preserved.
  • Wrist disarticulation – through the wrist joint.
  • Metacarpal amputation – the hand where the wrist is left intact. A partial hand amputation can keep the wrist in use.
  • Digit amputation – one (or more) of the fingers or the thumb, which can be the entire digit, or just the upper part or ‘tip’.

Lower limb amputation – the legs, feet or toes.

  • Pelvic or transpelvic amputation (also known as hemipelvectomy) - up to half of the pelvis and the entire leg on the same side.
    • Internal: part of the pelvis is removed but the leg is saved.
    • External: part of the pelvis is removed but the leg cannot be saved.
  • Hip disarticulation – entire leg through the hip joint capsule.
  • Transfemoral amputation (above the knee) – between the hip and the knee (through the thigh bone or femur), where full use of the hip joint is retained. Amputations, especially above-knee, can often lead to additional complications.
  • Knee disarticulation – through the knee joint itself.
  • Transtibial amputation (below the knee) – between the knee and the foot, preserving the use of the knee and most common form of amputation.
  • Ankle disarticulation – through the ankle joint, removing the foot but preserving the leg.
  • Partial foot amputation – part of the foot is removed.
  • Digit amputation – one or more toes, which can be the entire digit, or just the upper part or ‘tip’.
Read less

Should I make an amputation injury claim?

The decision to make a claim should always be yours, and yours alone. Amputation injuries are one of the most life-changing events that can happen to anyone in the workplace. The loss of a limb is not only physically disabling but is also often matched by a loss of self-esteem and a fear of what the future may hold. Therapy and counselling may be needed to help a patient who has lost a leg or arm come to terms with the overwhelming loss.

No amount of compensation will be able to reverse the suffering and stress caused to an amputee victim and their dependents. Following surgery, there will be many months of rehabilitation and a complete readjustment will be needed to cope with restricted function or movement and learning to use a prosthetic and other support equipment.

Even the most basic of tasks may present the biggest challenge, such as:

  • Moving around the house
  • Opening doors and cupboards
  • Holding common household objects
  • Walking up stairs.

A full limb amputation can often mean experiencing difficulties in returning to work or gaining re-employment. The impact on immediate and future earnings can often cause increased stress and psychological problems.

An employer has a legal responsibility to all employees, contractors and visitors in the workplace to ensure a safe work environment where machinery, equipment and tools are maintained to the required safety standards. An employer can be held responsible for a breach in the workplace safety regulations that failed to minimise the risk of a catastrophic injury and resulted in an amputation.

The decision to seek legal advice is never an easy one to make. Your Legal Friend has 30 years of experience and an in-depth knowledge of workplace law and serious injury compensation. From the first time we discuss the special circumstances of your case, our dedicated team of specialist solicitors will provide you with all the expert guidance you need to help you succeed in making your claim., Your Legal Friend is committed to making the securing the best possible  compensation for your present and future care, which can include:

  • Special equipment for essential daily activities
  • Costs  involved in adapting your home, where necessary
  • Special support equipment.
Read less

The most frequently reported serious injuries that lead to an amputation occur when:

  • Fingers, a hand or an entire upper arm becomes trapped and pulled into machinery with missing, faulty or disabled safety guards.
  • Feet, shins or thighs are struck or crushed between moving vehicles, forklift trucks or other mobile machinery, such as conveyor belts.

In some cases, the outcome can be fatal but most serious injuries result in a change of job or being forced to leave the workplace altogether. The impact on immediate earnings and longer-term financial security can often add to a deepening anxiety and cause psychological problems.

Every employer has a legal responsibility to provide a ‘duty of care’ to all employees, contractors and visitors in the workplace. This must include:

  • A safe work environment
  • Risk assessments
  • Machinery, equipment and tools maintained to the required safety standards
  • Adequate training
  • Personal protection equipment (PPE) and safety wear

Your employer can be held responsible for a breach in the regulations that govern health and safety in the workplace, which led to a catastrophic injury and the need for an amputation.

There were 19,707 major injuries to employees, including amputations, fractures and burns in 2012/13.

Traumatic amputation 

When a sudden and unexpected event occurs, which causes a limb to be violently torn away, the outcome is known as a ‘traumatic amputation’.  There are four main types of traumatic amputation:

  • Mechanical – most traumatic amputations are mechanical, caused by workplace machinery
  • Chemical – contact with corrosive chemicals
  • Electrical – a high voltage electric shock
  • Thermal – extreme levels of heat.

It may be possible to re-attach a partly severed or, possibly, a fully severed limb.  However, in the most serious cases when a traumatically injured limb cannot be saved, often because of severe blood vessel damage and tissue death, a prosthetic limb will usually be fitted.

Surgery is performed to shape the bone in the remaining limb and clean the wound, which can involve skin grafts. More than one procedure may be needed to prepare for fitting a prosthetic limb.

Surgical amputation

These amputations are performed by a doctor and may be the only option where a severe injury is caused by an accident at work, such as:

  • Crushing injuries
  • Blast injuries
  • Severe burns
  • Burns from acid or dangerous chemicals
  • If a serious limb injury is not treated promptly, there may be further complications caused by infection.
Read less

The most frequently reported serious injuries that lead to a surgical amputation are when fingers, a hand or an entire upper arm become trapped and pulled into machinery with missing, faulty or disabled safety guards. This is one of the most frequent and regular causes of serious injury and amputation.

In a number of cases, the guard has been disabled so any blockage that could slow or hold up production can be quickly cleared by an operator without following the necessary safety precautions that had been intended to prevent the risk of an accident.

Sometimes the guards are not re-attached following machine maintenance, service or repair. Feet, shins or thighs are struck or crushed between moving vehicles, forklift trucks or other mobile machinery.

A specific type of amputation is classified by the part of the body that is removed.  This applies to both traumatic and surgical amputations.

Upper limb amputation – the arms, hands or fingers.

  • Shoulder disarticulation – entire arm at shoulder level and through the shoulder.
  • Forequarter amputation – an entire arm at the shoulder, including removal of the shoulder and part of the shoulder blade and collarbone.
  • Trans-humeral amputation (above the elbow) – upper arm between the shoulder and the elbow, where the use of the shoulder is preserved.
  • Elbow disarticulation – through the elbow joint.
  • Transradial amputation (below the elbow) – through the forearm between the elbow and hand, where the use of the elbow is preserved.
  • Wrist disarticulation – through the wrist joint.
  • Metacarpal amputation – the hand where the wrist is left intact. A partial hand amputation can keep the wrist in use.
  • Digit amputation – one (or more) of the fingers or the thumb, which can be the entire digit, or just the upper part or ‘tip’.

Lower limb amputation – the legs, feet or toes.

  • Pelvic or transpelvic amputation (also known as hemipelvectomy) - up to half of the pelvis and the entire leg on the same side.
    • Internal: part of the pelvis is removed but the leg is saved.
    • External: part of the pelvis is removed but the leg cannot be saved.
  • Hip disarticulation – entire leg through the hip joint capsule.
  • Transfemoral amputation (above the knee) – between the hip and the knee (through the thigh bone or femur), where full use of the hip joint is retained. Amputations, especially above-knee, can often lead to additional complications.
  • Knee disarticulation – through the knee joint itself.
  • Transtibial amputation (below the knee) – between the knee and the foot, preserving the use of the knee and most common form of amputation.
  • Ankle disarticulation – through the ankle joint, removing the foot but preserving the leg.
  • Partial foot amputation – part of the foot is removed.
  • Digit amputation – one or more toes, which can be the entire digit, or just the upper part or ‘tip’.
Read less

The decision to make a claim should always be yours, and yours alone. Amputation injuries are one of the most life-changing events that can happen to anyone in the workplace. The loss of a limb is not only physically disabling but is also often matched by a loss of self-esteem and a fear of what the future may hold. Therapy and counselling may be needed to help a patient who has lost a leg or arm come to terms with the overwhelming loss.

No amount of compensation will be able to reverse the suffering and stress caused to an amputee victim and their dependents. Following surgery, there will be many months of rehabilitation and a complete readjustment will be needed to cope with restricted function or movement and learning to use a prosthetic and other support equipment.

Even the most basic of tasks may present the biggest challenge, such as:

  • Moving around the house
  • Opening doors and cupboards
  • Holding common household objects
  • Walking up stairs.

A full limb amputation can often mean experiencing difficulties in returning to work or gaining re-employment. The impact on immediate and future earnings can often cause increased stress and psychological problems.

An employer has a legal responsibility to all employees, contractors and visitors in the workplace to ensure a safe work environment where machinery, equipment and tools are maintained to the required safety standards. An employer can be held responsible for a breach in the workplace safety regulations that failed to minimise the risk of a catastrophic injury and resulted in an amputation.

The decision to seek legal advice is never an easy one to make. Your Legal Friend has 30 years of experience and an in-depth knowledge of workplace law and serious injury compensation. From the first time we discuss the special circumstances of your case, our dedicated team of specialist solicitors will provide you with all the expert guidance you need to help you succeed in making your claim., Your Legal Friend is committed to making the securing the best possible  compensation for your present and future care, which can include:

  • Special equipment for essential daily activities
  • Costs  involved in adapting your home, where necessary
  • Special support equipment.
Read less